Lang Lang adds another business partner

press release:

The ONE Music Group, creators of The ONE Smart Piano and The ONE Light keyboard, announces a long-term partnership with world-renowned concert pianist Lang Lang. As formal investor and supporter of The ONE Smart Piano, Lang Lang is a strong believer in making music education more accessible and enjoyable for people of all ages and skill levels.

“Music education of the future is what’s needed to help kids find their love for playing piano and allow them to grow their potential in music,” said Lang Lang. “The ONE represents the future of music education. Learning piano starts with The ONE.”

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  • ‘Grow potential’ – with what? Gravy train meets media again. What will J-Lo do next I wonder. No piano would be welcome.

    • Not sure I want to take moral high ground lessons form someone who uses the name of a serial killer as his signature. If it is your real name I apologise. But most people in England in recent years with that unfortunately-associated name have done something to moderate it.

      Where’s the harm? So the kid is making money. He is genuinely committed to music education — I have attended some of his outreach and master classes. After what the Chinese suffered for most of the 20th century, to say nothing of throughout history, I am not too bothered if a few of them find a way to make themselves popular and marketable.

  • Having lived with it for over 50 years I saw no reason to change it, there are many others in the same position and no offence is taken.
    I suppose it’s a sign of advancing years that one gets suspicious of these buzz words such as ‘grow potential’, and , dare I suggest, ‘outreach’. What does it actually mean beyond ‘market speak’?

  • No offence taken. Having lived with the name for considerably longer than the said lunatic I see no reason to conform or change. It’s never been a problem.
    I suppose advancing years tend to make one suspicious of such market speak as ‘grow potential’ whatever that means. Even more so the dreaded ‘outreach’ word, usually a euphemism for a decent arts grant which achieves little in the long run but satisfies the sponsor.

    • Okay, Mr. West, I’ll leave your name alone, and apology repeated.

      I dislike jargon too. One of my pet hates is “solutions” (which pops up in all sorts of marketing for items that one may well wish to purchase but had not anticipated doing in order to solve a”problem:” e.g. when I was looking for razor blades recently, the store clerk directed me to where the “shaving solutions” were to be found).

      But I have seen several orchestras and artists engaged in “outreach,” and what they have been doing has given the word meaning for me. They go and visit schools, community centres and other establishments for a wide area around their home bases, or when they are on tour, they play, to demonstrate, and they teach — perhaps groups, to play a simple recorder, or one-on-one with kids taking lessons in the instruments they represent; they sometimes rehearse a simple piece for a group to perform for their school or their community of family and friends. For the most part this sort of exercise is paid for by donors to the orchestra or group, or possibly donors to the school or other establishment. The musicians tend to charge little if anything — they may take gas expenses or a small honorarium but they are basically donating their time and ability to “reach out” to introduce young people — or sometimes simply people off the main flight path of touring orchestras, in small villages — to good music.

      And I have seen Lang Lang working with kids, and older students. with pleasure and diligence and attentiveness and encouragement. I know he is considered something of a joke around here, but he is not as bad as his sneering detractors claim, and in the several times I have encountered him — and I do mean met as well as watched — he has seemed to be a genuinely nice person. I think he communicates his pleasure in music and in life to the kids he meets. So sue me if I am naive, but I think we could use a few more people like that.

      His stature as a pianist is for others to determine, but I have no objection to his playing around with other forms than pure classical music, or to accepting high-profile gigs, or to endorsing products. We ought to be glad that a classical musician is a household name for about the first time since Bernstein’s heyday.

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