Lise Davidsen’s Met debut: first review

After the New York Times hypebomb, here’s a first independent view of the rising star from NY Classical Review:

.…when a soprano gets the PR blitz that Lise Davidsen has enjoyed for her introduction to the Met, it’s hard to miss. The company managed to draw what looked like a sellout crowd the day after Thanksgiving for the season premiere of Tchaikovsky’s The Queen of Spades, after a lengthy profile in the New York Times in which Antonio Pappano called the Norwegian soprano “A one-in-a-million voice” and Peter Gelb dubbed her “the next great Brünnhilde.” 

Those predictions will have to wait for now, but there’s no question Davidsen scored a major success in her house debut as Lisa. She boasts a voice of startling power, with bright color and warmth from top to bottom, but even more impressive than the voice itself is Davidsen’s astonishing technique. Whether bringing soft glow to an intimate moment in her middle voice, or finding focus in her bright, bell-like top, she was always in complete control of her instrument. Even her highest notes never felt the slightest push, sounding as comfortable as though she had approached them from above.

That complete confidence in her technique opened up a wide range of emotive possibilities in every part of her voice….

Read on here.

 

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  • Sixtus Beckmesser says:

    She was lovely as Freia in Das Rheingold @ Covent Garden last fall.

  • V. Lind says:

    Welcome to the big time, Lise! After your modest revelation, published here last week, it looks like your dreams had a great foundation in reality.

    All the best for a glittering career.

  • fflambeau says:

    The NEW YORK Times hyping the MET, also in New York? That’s unheard of.

  • sycorax says:

    I heard her first in Ariadne at Glyndebourne – and as she opened her mouth and started to sign I really sat there and was fascinated! What a great voice, what great technique!

  • kundry says:

    I think Lise is special and she will have a great career. I am happy for her debut at the MET – not the best role for her and to me, she did the best , without being right for it. She will need to be careful , continue studying and chose roles and places carefully. I totally believe that she has the potential to be as great as Nilsson and Flagstadt, but later , so give her time. Her voice needs to mature and settle. She is smart, well grounded, so the chances for that happening are real.

    • david hilton says:

      I couldn’t disagree more. The opera world of our day is full of singers who are ‘careful’, who don’t push their voice, who continue studying, who choose their roles and places to sing oh so carefully. . . . Until they have missed the opportunity and promise of their early career. To me those cliches are a prescription for limiting the expectations of gifted singers for their careers; by making longevity of career the highest goal for a singer to aspire to. How refreshing it would be to have a few singers who simply go for it, as the greats of the past century more frequently did, rather than try to be the next Susan Graham, or other singer who never pushes their voice or undertakes the great and popular roles for their fach. Yes Ponselle and Callas were finished by the time they were 40. Jeritza too. But they were Ponselle; they were Callas; they were Jeritza. Their careers are remembered with an intense appreciation unlikely to be generated by the ‘careful’ singers of today.

  • Nicholas Ennos says:

    It is impossible to take this review seriously as it also gives rave notices to Netrebko’s husband who is the world’s worst singer. With the Met also recently employing Susan Alexander impersonator Peretyatko this opera house has become a standing joke.

    • Mikhado says:

      A kindred spirit; the appalling singing at the Met these days in depressing, truly horrid. I wonder how long it is until Celine Dion is engaged for Isolde.

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