New video: All 24 Paganini variations played one on top of the other

Ask not the reason why, except that technology makes it possible.

Our friend Eric Silberger, a Lorin Maazel  protégé, has layered the complete set of Paganini variations onto one video screen, filmed and produced by fellow-violinist Lara St John. You see it here first.
silberger maazel
Beats playing scales any day.

share this

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on google
  • Obviously a gifted player – shame he demeans his artistry with such a trashy gimmick. Can’t see that Lorin Maazel would have approved.

  • The playing is first class and the entire canonic build up to an musically epic end is truly remarkable,worthy of great Bach.
    To negatively comment on such great achievement only reflects small and narrow minds,not to mention
    some “jealousy”maybe(?) for not have created something as ingenious and grand as this work.

    • Mr. Weisenblum , cut the baloney and give us all a piece ……..why would
      any one be “jealous ” of the mediocre ?Grand work indeed !!!!!!!??????

  • Actually, it is a nice idea for a video that is violinistically very well executed. All these self-proclaimed “experts” who belittle this performance and criticize it in most insulting yet utterly un-constructive terms show nothing but their ignorance that is particularly evident since not one of them has pointing out the glaring error in the headline: Paganini’s famous Caprice No. 24 has not two dozen but merely eleven (that’s 11!) variations, preceded by the theme and followed by a brief coda.

  • I’m with Weisenblum (well nearly – perhaps “worthy of great Bach” is going a bit too far).

    By the way, there are 11 variations, not 24.

  • Actually, it is a nice idea for a video that is violinistically very well executed. All these self-proclaimed “experts” who belittle this performance and criticize it in most insulting yet utterly un-constructive terms show nothing but their ignorance that is particularly evident since not one of them so far here has pointed out the glaring error in the headline: Paganini’s famous Caprice No. 24 has not two dozen but merely eleven (that’s 11!) variations, preceded by the theme and followed by a brief coda.

  • Too fun! But I can’t imagine it would be calming to cats, which is the initial Facebook entry in which I found it! Ha ha and ha!

  • >