Leonard Slatkin is asked to show he’s alive

After being paraded among the roll of the recent dead on the Emmys on Sunday, Leonard Slatkin got a call to appear on ABC’s  Jimmy Kimmel Live to prove he’s still with us.

‘Please welcome the newly resurrected Leonard Slatkin,’ said Kimmel.

More here.

Fox, reportedly, are still trying to reach Andre Previn.

 

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    • Really? Fox is more accurate that CNN, MSNBC, ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS. They have the highest cable news ratings by far. Leans right, sure. But far, far more balanced than any other.

      • Fox provides balance by hiring significant talent on the left such as Juan Williams and Donna Brazile to provide the counter argument. You may dislike Tucker Carlson but look at how many people he brings on who are solidly on the left. I don’t see a similar balance rom CNN or MSNBC. Many at Fox are not in Trump’s camp (Shepard Smith for example) and their news people like Bret Baier are excellent. People who say that they hate Fox never watch it so their views are hardly informed. And Greg Gutfeld’s weekend show is funnier than anything on cable news.

      • Yes, and ratings are directly correlated to truthfulness and accuracy. Sort of like the Jerry Springer show………………

      • CNN: the news outlet feeding questions to one candidate in the 2016 presidential debate. Absolutely priceless. The rest on your list are all activist outlets, too.

        When are they all going to learn that confirmation bias and activism is no substitute for objective journalism? (Never, because they’re encouraged to do this in university journalism degrees!)

    • Jimmy Kimmel had nothing to do with the Emmys or with their photo mistake. His “bit” last night—on his own show—was funny and served to remind viewers that Leonard Slatkin exists and is very much alive.

  • First, one should not confuse Fox Entertainment with Fox News. The former is now owned by Disney. These are two separte parts of the television community.

    The Kimmel Show asked me to come on, clearly as a reaction to having my picture show up instead of Andre’s. I used the occasion to say how important it was for Andre to be remembered as he should have been. More people now know about him than most of those given tributes during the in Memoriam segment. There was no making fun of Andre and the producers made it clear to me that this was not their intent. They were citing the error and I was happy to go along with that.

    • Kimmel is a funny guy, and I have long enjoyed his work, even though it might not always be the classiest touch (The Man Show). I was a little bit apprehensive about how this piece might go, but I agree that they got this right.

      Anyone who might be laboring under the notion that AP didn’t have a terrific sense of humor needs to check out the Grieg piano concerto sketch with Morecambe & Wise. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7GeKLE0x3s

      May reports of your demise be wrong for many more years!

    • Maestro Slatkin deserves great credit for handling all of this in the best way possible. The discussion above his comment about different networks has nothing to do with the reasons why this happened.

      However, I do want to mention a different journalistic factor that was probably very much in play. In my experience in journalism in general, the true underlying reason for the large majority of factual errors (and the mistaken photo is a form of journalistic error) is not haste or sloppiness but cultural unawareness. In this case there was not anyone in the production line of the televised Emmys who was engaged enough in classical music to recognize Leonard Slatkin. Or, for that matter, who is engaged deeply enough in the past history of significant cultural contributions to television and other popular-culture media to recognize what Andre Previn does or doesn’t look like. A mistake like this simply doesn’t happen without those conditions. It’s flagged and corrected before it goes on the air or in print rather than after.

      At the risk of connecting this up with other issues discussed on this website, this is why I often feel there is a disconnect in understanding how to advance the field that equally affects such ostensibly warring parties as management and musicians in orchestra strikes. It’s intuitive to both sides that they yell and scream (in their very different ways) about “support for the arts” from various high-level public and private sources when the underlying issue is always – always – fannies in the seats or the lack thereof. Or at an even more fundamental level, the lack of general “watercooler conversation” about serious art music (or whatever you want to call this field) beyond a tightly bounded community. Which in my view is dramatically more important than the extra hyperventilating adjective in the season brochure or the last dash of color in the new flash presentation on the concert presenter’s website.

      I realize that many Slipped Disc readers who see this will consider it a spurious or irrelevant observation in discussing the Emmys mix-up. But I bet some others do see the connection. I know I do.

  • It is particularily unfortunate about Previn, because of his extensive history in Hollywood during the big studio era. He deserved more, a fitting tribute about all of the musicals he worked on.

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