Philly and Shanghai Phil in people swap deal

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Philadelphia, May 26, 2019)—Culminating The Philadelphia Orchestra’s 2019 Tour of China, officials from The Philadelphia Orchestra, ShanghaiTech University, and the Shanghai Philharmonic Orchestra today signed a three-year agreement, formalizing a new strategic partnership that will enable meaningful people-to-people exchange through collaborative residency work. Through 2022, the Orchestra will send musicians annually to ShanghaiTech University for residency activities with musicians of the Shanghai Philharmonic Orchestra, including side-by-side rehearsals and concerts, coaching sessions, master classes, and more, which will be open to ShanghaiTech faculty, staff, and students. Members of The Philadelphia Orchestra will also participate in student music activities on campus to enhance students’ musical cultivation and arts education. This strategic partnership enhances an existing partnership between The Philadelphia Orchestra and the Shanghai Media Group Performing Arts Division, which operates the Shanghai Philharmonic Orchestra.

 

“Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the musicians of The Philadelphia Orchestra are devoted to sharing the power of music as widely as possible and to nurturing the next generation of musicians,” said Philadelphia Orchestra President and CEO Matías Tarnopolsky. “We are delighted to partner with two important institutions that share these goals as we continue a meaningful model of exchange through music. Over the next three years, we look forward to exploring new ways to deepen our connections to China through this powerful collaboration.”

 

“At ShanghaiTech, we believe it’s not just enough to nurture students’ academic potential in scientific research, we also have to nurture their creativity and cultural understanding,” said ShanghaiTech Vice President and Provost Professor Yin Jie. “This partnership with The Philadelphia Orchestra and the Shanghai Philharmonic Orchestra is a unique chance for students and faculty to gain access to world-class musical performances on campus and to engage in musical activities. We hope the integration of music and science and technology will inspire our community and create opportunities for innovation and creativity.”

 

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  • phf655 says:

    What is in this for the Philadelphia Orchestra, except, perhaps money, which isn’t mentioned in the press release? It bothers me when major arts organizations line up to fawn over countries that have no respect for free speech, human rights, women’s rights, etc. And this includes the Louvre, with its relationship to Abu Dhabi, as well as New York University, whose connections to the arab world have at least provoked controversy among students and faculty

    • Nick2 says:

      I’m all for this type of exchange. If phf655 is bothered about it and similar exchanges, I suspect he must be close to a nervous wreck for there are so many out there in the big wide world.

      I do not know what country phf655 comes from and I apologise in advance if it is not the USA. But with states in the USA now hell bent on trampling on women’s rights to their own bodies and condemning medical doctors to up to 95 years in prison for assisting a woman to have an abortion even as a result of rape or incest, condemning arts organizations for such cross-border cooperations seems infinitely preferable.

    • Sara says:

      the us empire does not care abt anything other than $ and power. No respect for anything other than imperialism.

  • Jeffrey Biegel says:

    This is a wonderful way to share music on a global journey together!

  • fflambeau says:

    The Philadelphia Orchestra has a long-standing commitment to Asia: I saw Muti conduct them in Vietnam in the 1990’s.

    I think that’s smart and they were way ahead of the curve.

  • fflambeau says:

    I made a mistake in my prior post.

    It was not Muti but Wolfgang Sawallisch who led the Philadelphia Orchestra during their 1999 Asian Tour (his second with the Philadelphians). I kept the program which featured Howard Hanson’s “Romantic Symphony” and Berlioz’s “Symphony Fantastique”.

    It’s nice to see this tradition deepened and expanded.

    (May I suggest an edit function for the blog?).

  • deb says:

    WONDERFUL! Music is the bridge

  • anon says:

    All it is is the Shanghai Phil paying for coaches to fly in to rehearse them and play with them, not sure why they needed some exclusive partnership with any specific orchestra, they could just invite whomever they want from any orchestra in the world they want, pay and accommodations don’t seem to be an issue, there’ll be plenty of takers…

  • Ben says:

    There is little integrity left in Philly. Money… money… show me more money. China has boat load of money. Here they go. Seriously, why would anybody wanna go to China if Europe is calling?

    Am I the only one who feel irate about their floating price scheme like United Airlines? If you check their Bernstein Candide program (June 20), all remaining seats are now charging USD $300 each, regardless of location. They out-did themselves with the John Williams concert a few years ago (USD $200). In fact, POA appeared to be deliberately blocking the remaining seats from purchase (at much lower prices) for a while, thus creating high tension, artificial demands in the style of the Epi-Pen maker, then all of a sudden, the seats are available at USD $300.

    Philly is the only music organization I know that jacks up ticket prices after they were published. What kind of integrity is that?

  • Not A Fan says:

    There is little integrity left in Philly. Money… money… show me more money. China has boat load of money. Here they go. Seriously, why would anybody wanna go to China if Europe is calling?

    Am I the only one who feel irate about their floating price scheme like United Airlines? If you check their Bernstein Candide program (June 20), all remaining seats are now charging USD $300 each, regardless of location. They out-did themselves with the John Williams concert a few years ago (USD $200). In fact, POA appeared to be deliberately blocking the remaining seats from purchase (at much lower prices) for a while, thus creating high tension, artificial demands in the style of the Epi-Pen maker, then all of a sudden, the seats are available at USD $300.

    Philly is the only music organization I know that jacks up ticket prices after they were published. What kind of integrity is that?

  • Not A Fan says:

    And the convenience fee? Usually USD $4. For the Bernstein Candide, all of a sudden, it’s now charging USD $30 per ticket.

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