Covent Garden chief is plucked by Google

The Royal Opera House’s head of marketing Lucy Sinclair is moving on after three years to teach Google new arias.

These are the achievements she lists:

 – Increased financial capacity of the venues in 2017/18 through a new data-led pricing and marketing strategy. Increased full price sales from 83% to 89% (against a London market average of 43%) delivering a £2 million increase in profit.
– Grew CRM results from 8% to 25% of total revenue, whilst halving the costs
– Achieved annual footfall targets within first few months of new brand positioning and drove positive brand perception shifts among target consumers after one month of a new campaign
– Lead team of 60 including Analytics and Audience Insight, Marketing Communications, Broadcast Production, Media Distribution, Creative Studios and Digital Product Management
– Introduced Agile and OKRs and restructured the division to create alignment and focus on growth targets.

Not strong on communication.

 

 

share this

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on google
  • Not strong on communication?

    Looks like she pitched her communications to her new employer very well. This is exactly the language used in multinational tech companies.

  • Thanks for one hilarious post. These are the depths to which classical music marketing has devolved. Now remind me, what product was she selling????

    • Ultimately, concerning arts consumption, people spend money for gratification, for stimulating feelings. If marketing can promise them that successfully, it has done its job. BUT…if that promise is not delivered in the content, then marketing fails ultimately. But three years is a short enough time to move on before the non-returning initially interested are noticed…

  • She did all that? The other hundreds of employees and guest artists had nothing to do with it? Wow she is great…

  • The fundamental take out from this is that a team of 60-80 produced an increase in profit of £2m. £25k-£33k per head of staff.

    On those terms, this hardly seems impressive.

  • “Not strong on communication”

    …says the guy who has so many errors (grammatical and factual) in his online blog that it is basically self moderated by the comment section.

  • A staff of sixty is unbelievable. Multi-national corporations manage with less. Frankly, she has been an expensive disaster.

  • Not enough hours in the day for her. Or, of course, it could all be modern networking bullshit, of the kind we are fed on a daily basis. Now let me see….which is it?

  • >