Pittsburgh loses artistic planner as new regime begins

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra has a new, young president starting soon. One veteran exec sniffed the air and decided to call its quits. He circulated his resignation reasons today.

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Dear friends and colleagues:

Last December I began a sabbatical which has been very beneficial for me and my family. It has been a wonderful time of reflection and contemplation. This process has allowed me to do a thorough re-evaluation of my priorities and plans.

As a result, I have decided to retire from the Pittsburgh Symphony. It has been my honor and privilege to work with Music Directors Lorin Maazel, Mariss Jansons, and Manfred Honeck. I have the utmost respect for Jim Wilkinson, Dick Simmons, Tom Todd, the Trustees of the Pittsburgh Symphony, and my colleagues on the staff present and past. I would specifically like to thank Jim Wilkinson, Katie McGuinness, Jesse Montgomery, Yonca Karakilic, Alison Bolton, and Shelly Fuerte for their steadfast support of me, and of the PSO’s artistic excellence.

And to the gifted musicians of the PSO, please know how much I admire and respect you. The very best thing about working here has been listening to you play literally thousands of concerts over a quarter of a century, in Heinz Hall and around the world. These have given me immeasurable joy. And I will look forward to listening to many more in the future.

This orchestra is the cultural crown jewel of Pittsburgh, and one of the great orchestras of the world. I am honored to have been a part of it for twenty-six years, and I will always wish for its continued success and prosperity.

Robert Moir
Senior Vice President of Artistic Planning and Audience Engagement
Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

 

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  • Robert Levin says:

    What a classy letter!

  • william osborne says:

    In classical music we often hear the cautious repetition of phrases we’ve heard a thousand times.

  • John Nemaric says:

    Finally, a real PITA out of the PSO. Our hope is that future programming will change for the best and a new Art Director will bring the PSO up and out to the 21st. Century. Indeed good news and though the resignation letter reads “classy” there was nothing classy about his dictatorial demeanor. I’ve (and many others) have been waiting for this a long, long time.

  • Larry says:

    Do you have specific proof that he is retiring because of a new CEO being hired? Mr. Moir has been with the Symphony for 26 or 27 years. That’s a long time for anyone in this business!

  • Robert Moir says:

    Norman, please let me assure you and your readers who may care that my decision to retire after twenty-six years had nothing to do with the choice or arrival of a new CEO. While I can understand that it would be easy to connect the two because of the timing, my decision is something I have been contemplating for nearly two years for purely personal reasons. I wish incoming CEO Melia Tourangeau and the Pittsburgh Symphony nothing but the best and will be one of their most ardent supporters from the sidelines.

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