Hey, what? This maestro needs a new website

Clemens Schuldt is described by his agent as ‘one of the most exciting young conductors emerging from Germany’.

After that, his official website bio goes into gobbledygook.

– Hey what the assistant conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra for one year…

– He is Conducting investigation orchestras as the German Symphony Orchestra Berlin…

– Born in Bremen, Clemens Schuldt of studied violin at the Robert Schumann Hochschule…

Oh, dear. They ust assume no-one reads the rubbish that agents put out.

Read here.

Clemens Schuldt

UPDATE: The maestro got one. We’ve heard from KDSchmid, who have updated Clemens’s site. They suggest it might have been hacked. New, cleaned-up site here.

 

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  • Google Translate clearly had a night on the town before dealing with that text but I’ve seen much worse. There’s no excuse, really; pretty much anyone in the business should be able to drum up the help of an articulate native English speaker. Their problem, though.

    • …just before they become ‘One of the most dynamic conductors/sopranos/baritones/shop assistants/bus drivers of their generation’.

  • Many SD readers wouldn’t believe how frequently really badly constructed biographies are sent out by managements to the people who employ their artists: the concert halls, festivals, orchestras and so on. We reckon to rewrite, totally, over half the biographies we receive, often re-spelling names of composers, giving works their actual titles (often from a muddle of languages), correcting names of conductors, orchestras and opera companies – and that’s before we start to make the biography consistent in style throughout.

    Biographies often appear to have been handed for completion to the most junior employee, or a work experience trainee, yet a biography is one of the most important selling tools for an artist management. It’s not as if it’s so difficult to check a spelling, provided you have an internet connection (or New Grove) and 30 seconds to spare.

    Perhaps SD could run a competition to award a wooden spoon to the most unhelpful biog that a promoter has recently received. You may be inundated with entries…

  • It’s odd because this conductor’s spoken English is flawless. Absolutely perfect British English with a slight trace of a German accent. This mess cannot be his doing. He probably trusted some lame publicist who did the hack job we’re seeing. He’s a young maestro, just starting out, and it probably never ocurred to him to question what his publicist is putting out there.

    I would be really really angry if I were this conductor. He should fire whoever did this and out him ASAP so it doesn’t happen to anyone else.

  • I am reminded of a Romanian music festival whose blurb stated: “We are ravished to have four of the most notorious European conductors at our festival”.

    • Hilarious…. It is not only in music life that English gets off the rails. A musician friend of mine encountered this notice on an elevator in Japan: ‘In case of repair you become unbearable.’

  • Even when reasonably well-written and accurate as to detail, the bios sent out by managements are almost always appalligly boring — a list of works the artist has performed and where, sometimes with adjectives drawn from reviews. Why not something about the interests of the performer aside from music–something that would tend to make him or her appear to be a more fully rounded human being?

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