Daniel Barenboim conducted his first concert in Gaza today.

Given that its Hamas Government has simultaneously made peace with Fatah and endorsed Osama Bin Laden as a holy martyr, this could hardly be a more delicate moment to make music. I, for one, can’t wait to see the film.

 

Here’s the press release:

Maestro Daniel Barenboim performed in Gaza today – ACCENTUS Music to film the concert of the ‘Orchestra for Gaza’
Maestro Daniel Barenboim, UN Messenger of Peace, conducts the ‘Orchestra for Gaza’ consisting of distinguished musicians from Staatskapelle Berlin, Berlin Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic, Orchestre de Paris, and Orchestra of La Scala di Milano, in a peace concert for the people of Gaza today. The concert with works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart takes place this afternoon at the Al Mathaf Cultural House, Gaza.
The ACCENTUS Music documentary team, under the direction of Paul Smaczny, are exclusively accompanying Daniel Barenboim and the musicians for this very special event to film the concert with three cameras.
Maestro Barenboim said: “We are very happy to come to Gaza. We are playing this concert as a sign of our solidarity and friendship with the civil society of Gaza.”
This event has been organized by the Palestinian Non-Governmental Organizations Network and the Al Mathaf Cultural House, in cooperation with the Office of the United Nations Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process (UNSCO) and the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA).
And here’s the Reuters report:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110503/music_nm/us_palestinians_gaza_music?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

Barenboim conducts classical concert in Gaza Strip

 

By Nidal al-Mughrabi – 42 mins ago

GAZA (Reuters) – Classical musician Daniel Barenboim, a supporter of Palestinian rights, broke new ground Tuesday when he travelled to the Gaza Strip to conduct a concert.

Musicians from some of Europe’s top orchestras entered the coastal enclave from Egypt via the Rafah border crossing amid tight security, to form the “Orchestra for Gaza” and play Mozart’s “Eine Kleine Nachtmusik” and the Symphony No. 40.

Barenboim’s appearance with the orchestra, players of the Staatskapelle Berlin, Berlin Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic, Orchestre de Paris and La Scala of Milan, was a first in recent memory in Gaza where traditional Arabic music is more common.

An audience of some 700 attended the hour-long concert at the plush al-Madha center along the beachfront in the northern Gaza Strip.

The event was organized by the United Nations Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process (UNSCO) and the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) that cares for Palestinian refugees in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

When introducing the event, Barenboim said the concert was taking place because “these are people who care about you, this is why we are here today.”

Barenboim has become a controversial figure in Israel for his vocal opposition to its occupation of the West Bank, where he has performed on several occasions.

Since 1999, he has promoted Arab-Israeli cultural contacts and he leads the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, made up of young Israeli and Arab musicians which is based in Seville, Spain.

In 2008, Argentine-born Barenboim, 68, also took Palestinian citizenship and said he believed his status could serve as a model for peace between Israelis and Palestinians.

“As you know I am Palestinian … not (just) because I have a Palestinian passport and I am also Israeli, so you see it is possible to be both, but in order … to have justice and peace we have to do many things.

“Our conflict is a conflict of two peoples who are convinced they have the right to live in the same little piece of land, therefore, our destinies are linked,” he said.

“No people should be expected to live under occupation,” Barenboim added as he received a standing ovation from the audience of academics, foreign guests and schoolchildren.

GAZA POLITICS

The concert comes a day before Islamist Hamas, who rule the Gaza Strip, and the more secular Fatah faction that controls the occupied West Bank, were due to sign a reconciliation agreement they hope will heal a political rift between them.

Israel maintains a blockade of Gaza because it is run by Hamas, who unlike Fatah, are hostile to the Jewish state and refuse to recognize interim peace accords or renounce violence.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’ Fatah movement, once the dominant Palestinian party, was driven out of the Gaza Strip by Hamas in a brief civil war four years ago.

Barenboim, today considered one of the world’s leading conductors of the operas of Richard Wagner, Hitler’s favorite composer, has further damaged his reputation in Israel where he has tried unsuccessfully to break an unofficial taboo on playing the music of the German composer.

(Writing by Ori Lewis)

Fresh off a flight from Los Angeles, the irrepressible Deborah Borda told classical music today that it had a future.

It was not entirely the one the International Artists Managers Association wanted to hear, but then she’s got the Dude and they haven’t. So she speaks and they listen.
And what she says is that there is a new landscape out there for classical concerts and a hundred new ways to reach it. But you don’t need my summary.
Here is her speech.

 

21st
IAMA International Conference, London April 2011

 

April
13, MEDIA DAY: Artists and Media in a Changing Landscape: Keynote speech from

Deborah Borda, President and Chief Executive Office, LA
Phil:

 

 

 

MANY VOICES TO MANY EARS

 

Good morning. It is a pleasure to join you today. My
assignment this morning is to start us thinking about “artists and media in a
changing landscape”. I just flew in from California so it might be appropriate
to start with an overview from say 30,000 feet up to survey a constantly
shifting global phenomenon. Later on it might be stimulating to take a look at
some specific strategies we have used at the Los Angeles Philharmonic to gain
traction in this rapidly changing environment. After all, I come from a country
where my President, Barack Obama, tweets. And I can’t help noticing that Queen
Elizabeth now has a Facebook page.

 

No matter what segment of our industry you come from, I
hope that from the grand heights of policy to the very concrete there will be
something of use for you today — even if only to admit to a common emotion. May
we agree this is a rather scary time? Auden and Bernstein had their AGE OF
ANXIETY and now we have one of our very own. Remember “normal”? My supposition
is that that is a place to which we will never return. So we can either be
anxious or we can begin to think in adaptive, creative, and flexible ways.

 

We are in the midst of a far-reaching technological
revolution — one that is by turns either strangely underestimated or overblown.
The fallout from that change is redefining society — and the music profession,
which is having to redefine itself, is a microcosm of the larger world. The
problem is that we aren’t quite sure how best to adapt to this new world, and
to inhabit it vibrantly.

 

I realize that this is a music industry conference, so
please bear with me as I make a little detour into world politics. Only weeks
ago, we witnessed a stunning and swift populist revolution in Egypt. In a
highly repressive atmosphere, it was organized and implemented through social
media. In the “old days,” you fomented a revolution by sending in your troops
to take over a radio or TV station, rendering one voice to many ears. With the
advent of social media, this is no longer necessary. It is now many voices to
many ears. The internet connects hundreds of millions of people, and there is
no single controlling organization. As the author and social commentator
Malcolm Gladwell recently observed, “…hierarchies are sent askew and monopolies
are broken.”

 

Here’s a stunning fact: 1 in 13 people in the entire world
are now on Facebook, according to the source Online Schools. The individual can
broadcast to many, becoming the distributor and the broadcaster, via social
media and YouTube. This, along with changing distribution technologies, means
we are in a media landscape that offers the consumer almost limitless options
for information and content. It’s up to all of us to try to figure out how to
use new media successfully. Adaptability, as Darwin realized, is the key. We
must understand the importance of adapting to the changing landscape, and do it
with the greatest possible flexibility, because everything may change again by
the end of this year, or even the end of this speech.

 

Consumers no longer obtain information from a single
source, and they formulate their opinions via a tapestry of sources. Little
more than a decade ago, three major television networks ruled the airwaves in
the United States. Americans formed their worldview through them. Now even a
modest cable package offers 400 stations. A nation of viewers which defined
itself and the world by watching three channels is now flooded with
alternatives. Newspaper executives are frantically trying to capture audience
and dollars in an age when it is easier and often free to go online. The number
of paper books I have purchased in the past two years has diminished by 90%
because I have my trusty Kindle. And I am a hard-core reader who loves the feel
and look of an old-fashioned print book. Our descendants will laugh their
holographic heads off when they hear about us having driven back and forth to
video stores.

 

The rate of change in the world and our industry is
dizzying. Access to more information, more easily, is surely positive — but
there is a flip side: with it comes more “noise,” more competition for the
attention of our music lover, the consumer, our patron. Today’s consumer is
always connected, with many windows open on several devices. Our challenge is
to use new media to attract and hold these consumers, to “friend” them. The
trouble is many of the people who need to exploit new technology too often
stand in its way. Given the impact of Napster at the end of the 20th
century, why did we not all immediately understand the change in consumer
buying patterns and the importance of iTunes when it arrived in 2003? We missed
the boat, and we can’t do that again.

 

 

This leads me back to our art, our passion — the world of
music. There has truly been a “paradigm shift” in the landscape, both
technologically and in changing audience expectations. Let’s quick-scan a list
of a real-time progression of change.

 

The ’90s saw a boom in product demand as the world
transferred their musical archive to CDs. We have now made another Olympian
leap — to digital distribution. Immediate access and availability of product is
now both a reality and an expectation. Audiences can download a full album
within seconds of release, or sign on to YouTube to see video captured by fans
at a concert, or a TV show they may have missed. The fact that more than 2
billion videos are viewed daily on YouTube is a testament to current audience
appetite for content, and especially audio-visual content, which at one time
was much more expensive for the average individual to produce.

 

With access to so much content, a lot of it free, audiences
on average are less apt to pay as much as they once did for recordings. Sales
for a successful album have been readjusted in the last decade. When I was
Managing Director of the New York Philharmonic in the early ’90s, we counted on
close to one million dollars a year in recording royalties flowing to our
coffers. While I can’t reveal another orchestra’s secrets, the amount today is
a fraction of that and this holds true across the board for American
orchestras.

 

The same rise in social media which led to political
dethroning, has meant that our audience can provide us with immediate feedback.
Not long ago, we expected to get a few letters a couple of days after a
controversial program. Now, within minutes it’s on our Facebook page. This is a
mighty tool and our single most direct connection to our audience. The real
time interchange with audiences is so valuable that high-level marketing
professionals speculate that social media, properly used, may supplant current
audience research methods.

 

Audience expectation is a two-headed monster which demands
care and feeding — but a monster properly harnessed can be a very good friend.
Audiences now demand instant gratification. They want access to artists, top
notch artistic product; they have higher expectations and want it cheaper, free,
and with fewer barriers to gaining access. “Why can’t I get exactly the seat I
see on this chart for the concert?” or “Why can’t I have a freshly burned CD of
this concert as I walk out the door?” However, what sounds like doom and gloom
in terms of growing expectations is, in fact, positive, because never before
have we been able to get closer to our audience. So, let’s see how we can do
it.

 

I speak to you today through a rather specific lens — my
role as the executive leader of an American orchestra which in the past decade
has become the single largest symphonic institution in the US and second only
to the Metropolitan Opera in budget size. We have tried to re-imagine and
redesign ourselves as a broad-spectrum producer of music, media, and
educational initiatives. We guide our decision-making by our commitment to two
deeply held values — innovation and excellence. That may sound a bit
simplistic, but we have found that rigorous dedication to these principles has
resulted in vibrant and varied artistic production as well as fiscal stability.
That said, we have found the changing landscape of media very challenging to
navigate.

 

Might new media and the internet allow us to establish a
globalized brand, an opportunity to spread our mission and differentiate
ourselves in a crowded landscape? An opportunity to become a trusted partner,
curator, in providing the very best in musical content and experiences for our
consumers? We think so. Here are some concrete ways (which in real time may no
longer sound particularly innovative to you) in which the LA Phil has embraced
the changing media landscape.

 

When we began distributing concerts on iTunes in 2005, it
was a radical departure from commitment to physical product. As one of the
first orchestras to welcome digital distribution, we had to make fundamental
changes in approach and concept. First, a new financial arrangement with
orchestra members was necessary, one that treated new media differently from
traditional media. Basically, this meant not paying the musicians upfront but
using a profit-sharing model. Next, a much quicker turnaround of recordings for
release was critical. For us, the numbers might not have been as strong but we
decided that the promotional impact would be of high value because it was
crucial to our brand that we be “in the space”. It was and is particularly
important that the releases be representative of the organization’s and music
director’s artistic vision, including our commitment to new music, to better
define our brand.

 

One very successful way we have deepened the relationship
with our audience is with mobile apps — three in particular. With BRAVO GUSTAVO
— an engaging game with the phone as a baton — you can conduct excerpts from a
Mahler Symphony with Gustavo. Our LA Phil and Hollywood Bowl apps let you get
anything from tickets, program, and artists information, to a map of our
orchestra layout and individual musician photos, as well as a wealth of other
information. These apps are free, and enhance the patron experience. All three
have had more than 100,000 downloads.

 

The key benefit of this tool is that it opens up a two-way
conversation with consumers and increases our presence in the lives of our
audience so that we can stay relevant and “top of mind”. It is one of many
channels through which we communicate to our audience. The LA Phil’s Facebook
pages have a combined following of approximately 45,000 followers. We are also able
to speak to our digital family via Twitter, about virtually anything,
distribute exclusive content, and run promotions.

 

As we planned the introduction of our new Music Director
Gustavo Dudamel we wanted to send a strong message to a broad audience. This
message had to do with community, education, and music for all, and it was
critical that we leverage new media to deliver it. Dudamel’s first concert as
our Music Director was called “Bienvenido Gustavo,” a free 8-hour extravaganza
at the Hollywood Bowl that featured jazz greats such as Herbie Hancock, star
rock artists like Flea, and YOLA, our El Sistema-inspired youth orchestra, led
by Gustavo. The evening culminated in a performance of the Beethoven 9 with the
LA Phil and a mega community chorus. We streamed all 8 hours. Every artist on
the stage accepted no media compensation — a major change from the past. We
employed media to send a strong message — not for monetary gain. In turn, this
allowed us, and everyone involved in the day, a unique opportunity to connect
in LA and around the world with 40,000 viewers tuning in.

 

When the Metropolitan Opera launched their live HD
transmissions, many considered it a publicity stunt, a one-year wonder.
Surprise! It’s a hit. Soon after, the Berlin Philharmonic began HD transmissions
which are available online in the orchestra’s Digital Concert Hall. At the LA
Phil, we saw a unique opportunity to further establish our brand by utilizing
the singular assets of Gustavo Dudamel, Walt Disney Concert Hall, and our
orchestra. Here was a platform to bring music to more people in a live (key
word) and engaging way. These broadcasts let audiences see Gustavo and the
orchestra in new ways — literally being in Gustavo’s
dressing room just before the concert, in live interviews backstage, in
rehearsal clips and insightful pre-taped interviews — all of which allows each
viewer to be a fly on the wall as everyone prepares for the concert (and
recovers after). We are now playing in more than 500 theaters in the US and
Canada and our audience share has grown after just two concerts. This is an
investment in brand building and also keeps the band right on their
mettle.

 

Now a few summary thoughts as we kick off these meetings.
We are staring head on at a singular opportunity. Yes, it is about audience
access, changing expectations, and the allocation of resources to keep up. What
will be required to stay on top of the multi-channel 21st-century conversation
we may now hold with our audiences?

 

More importantly, it is about agility and action to stay
relevant. We require a long-term view, which is not so different from the past,
but access, tools, and revenue streams have surely changed. Finally, let’s return
to that 30,000-foot view where we began this morning to acknowledge something
else. Creating impact in this new media landscape is about alignment of
institutional values. It is dangerous to adapt values to a new technology or
system of delivery; this is how organizations or individual artists could lose
sight of their mission, identity, and central purpose. It is about the concept
that we are building brands, not only producing recordings as an end unto
themselves. In the end, innovation and excellence must be our guides.

 

In closing, I would simply like to observe that since I
began this talk, 34 million videos have been watched on You Tube. It is a time
of many voices to many ears. Thank you very much.

 

A violin concerto by Osvaldo Golijov that was meant to be premiered by Leonidas Kavakos with Gustavo Dudamel won’t be ready in time for its scheduled outing on May 5. The LA Phil have replaced it with Dutilleux’s L’arbre des songes, which doesn’t get heard nearly as often as it deserves. No excuses from Good Golly Miss Molly. He just says he’s running late.

Worse, the LA Phil have had to cancel a second premiere the same month. Peter Lieberson has been too sick to finish his percussion concerto in time. He’ll be replaced by the overplayed Gorecki third symphony. That’s more of a cop-out. But I guess the orch is reeling from two unforseen blows.

Press release follows

 

 

MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT ** MEDIA ALERT

 

The repertoire for two of the LA Phil’s Brahms Unbound concerts, led by Music Director Gustavo Dudamel, has been changed.

&nbs

p;

Osvaldo Golijov’s Violin Concerto, scheduled for its world premiere performances May 5 – 8, will be replaced with Dutilleux’s L’arbre des songes. Osvaldo Golijov regrets being unable to complete the concerto in time for these performances. The world premiere will be rescheduled for a future date. The scheduled soloist, Leonidas Kavakos, will perform the work by Dutilleux. The complete program is as follows:

 

Thursday, May 5, 2011 at 8 p.m.

Friday, May 6, 2011 at 8 p.m.

Saturday, May 7, 2011 (Santa Barbara)

Sunday, May 8, 2011 at 2 p.m.

Gustavo Dudamel, conductor

Leonidas Kavakos, violin

BRAHMS Academic Festival Overture

DUTILLEUX L’arbre des songes, Concerto for Violin and Orchestra

BRAHMS Symphony No. 1

 

Peter Lieberson’s Percussion Concerto, scheduled for its world premiere performances May 26, 28 & 29, will be replaced with Gorecki’s Symphony No. 3. Peter Lieberson regrets that due to ongoing health issues he is unable to complete the concerto in time for these performances. The world premiere will be rescheduled for a future date. Percussion soloist Pedro Carneiro will not perform.The complete program is as follows:

 

Thursday, May 26, 2011 at 8 p.m.

Friday, May 27, 2011 at 8 p.m. (Casual Fridays concert. Gorecki not performed.)

Saturday, May 28, 2011 at 2 p.m.

Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 2 p.m.

BRAHMS Symphony No. 3

GORECKI Symphony No. 3  

 

For further details or questions, call 323.850.2000 from 10am – 6pm daily, or visit LAPhil.com.

The ascent of Gustavo Dudamel from the streets of Caracas to the heights of maestro fame has been both musical fairy-tale and a case of flawless image management. The fairy-tale continues, but the first blip has just appeared on his hitherto immaculate record.

A Deutsche Grammophon release of three Tchaikovsky Shakespeare suites with the Simon Bolivar Orchestra is one of those productions that adds no value at all – not to Tchaikovsky, nor to Shakespeare, nor to the musicians and their conductor.
The performances are sharp and snazzy as you’d expect, but Hamlet’s torment is barely felt, the Tempest is no more than a summer squall and Romeo and Juliet as among the least romantic accounts I have endured.
Gustavo Dudamel: Tchaikovsky & Shakespeare
Why this should be so is not immediately clear. The recording was made in Caracas last February by a DG team with three named producers. That may have been two too many. Somebody needed to take responsibility, to stand up and tell the Dude to deliver – more passions, more penetration, more value. At 65 minutes long, the record could have been saved by an encore firework.
Sadly, it goes down as a dud.
Gustavo Dudamel: Tchaikovsky & Shakespeare

The ascent of Gustavo Dudamel from the streets of Caracas to the heights of maestro fame has been both musical fairy-tale and a case of flawless image management. The fairy-tale continues, but the first blip has just appeared on his hitherto immaculate record.

A Deutsche Grammophon release of three Tchaikovsky Shakespeare suites with the Simon Bolivar Orchestra is one of those productions that adds no value at all – not to Tchaikovsky, nor to Shakespeare, nor to the musicians and their conductor.
The performances are sharp and snazzy as you’d expect, but Hamlet’s torment is barely felt, the Tempest is no more than a summer squall and Romeo and Juliet as among the least romantic accounts I have endured.
Gustavo Dudamel: Tchaikovsky & Shakespeare
Why this should be so is not immediately clear. The recording was made in Caracas last February by a DG team with three named producers. That may have been two too many. Somebody needed to take responsibility, to stand up and tell the Dude to deliver – more passions, more penetration, more value. At 65 minutes long, the record could have been saved by an encore firework.
Sadly, it goes down as a dud.
Gustavo Dudamel: Tchaikovsky & Shakespeare

Behind the scenes of Simon Rattle’s Berlin performance the Royal Festival Hall last night, I heard word of challenging developments. A colleague, just back from Caracas, was on a high from attending Gustavo Dudamel’s first performance of the work with the Simon Bolivar youth orchestra.

This was a first run-out ahead of the joint Mahler Project he is planning next year with his hometown band and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. It may not come out sounding as polished as the Berlin Philharmonic, but it has got my juices flowing for the future of Mahler interpretation once the centennial year is over.
Gustavo Dudamelhttp://www.artsjournal.com/slippeddisc/2011/02/rattles_mahler_third_-_or_mahl.html

Then, in the mail, came the last concert in the life of Dmitri Mitropoulos, the gay Greek giant who was hounded out of the New York Philharmonic and who died at La Scala in November 1960 while rehearsing this selfsame symphony. Before travelling to Milan, he performed it with the radio orchestra in Cologne. that concert has been retrieved from the archives and released on the Analekta label.

The opening is as different from Rattle’s as night from day – ominous, juddering, weighted with multiple connotations. Aside from the conductor’s structural certainty, a sense of foreboding is ineluctable – tragic and true. This is another Mahler record you should not miss.

Watching a BBC4 rerun last night of John Bridcut’s thoughtful bio-doc of England’s iconic composer, I was puzzled by an early clip of a young woman conductor I had never clocked before. But, knowing the frugal way that Bridcut builds his films with few inessentials, it was only a matter of time before her significance was revealed.

Natalia Luis-Bassa is her name (here’s her website) and the causes of her enthusiasm went unexplained, though it appears she leads a couple of orchs in the north of England and has won an award from the Elgar Society. 
Home in Caracas, she was conducting the Elgar second symphony with the Simon Bolivar national orchestra and the zeal with which those musicians blew away the old pomp and circumstance was a wonder to behold. My eyes opened even wider when I saw the ruminative young dude sitting, lips pursed, just behind Natalia’s left shoulder.

                                                                             &n
bsp;       &n
bsp;      photo: wikipedia
And there he was, Gustavo Dudamel, the Dude himself, soaking up English music like a citizenship candidate in a seedy Brighton language school. His first Elgar – who knows? But don’t be surprised of the man with the big moustache finds his way into the Dude’s LA playkit in the coming seasons.
Here’s Natalia conducting Elgar 2nd on Youtube.

Some folks just can’t stay away from the heat.

Over the weekend I had an email from Ed Smith saying he was going back to Mersey roots, and before I could digest that momentous news it has been outed in a press release (below).
Ed was the young manager of the Merseyside Youth Orchestra who groomed a kid percussionist called Simon Rattle. A few years later, as manager of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra he gave Rattle, 25, his first grown-up job … and the rest is music history.
After Birmingham, Ed managed the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Gothenburg Symphony, where he hired a kid conductor called Gustavo Dudamel.
And now he’s back, part-time, as artistic advisor to his alma mater, the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, which is riding high with Vasily Petrenko as conductor.
It’s good for Ed, great for Liverpool, and very heart-warming for those who like to believe that what comes round, comes round.
The vacancy he moves into was left by Andrew Cornall, who has joined EMI as A&R chief.

                                photo: www.hopestreet.co.uk

News Release

Immediate: 12 January 2011

 

Ed Smith Appointed Liverpool Philharmonic’s Interim Executive Director (Orchestra & Ensembles)

 

He takes up the role with immediate effect following Andrew Cornall’s departure to EMI Classics where he has been appointed Vice President of Artists and Repertoire.

 

Ed’s role will include the provision of artistic management support to the Chief Executive and Executive team and providing leadership focus to the Orchestra and Ensembles department whilst a new Executive Director is appointed.

A Liverpudlian, Ed began his career in orchestral management at Liverpool Philharmonic as a “dogsbody” after graduating with a degree in music from Durham University. He was manager of the Merseyside Youth Orchestra where he first met Simon Rattle as a 15 year-old percussionist. He became Deputy Chief Executive in 1975.

At 27, (the youngest orchestra CEO in Britain at the time) he was appointed Chief Executive to the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra where he stayed for 22 years. During his time there, he installed a 25-year-old Simon Rattle as principal conductor and began a professional partnership that established the orchestra’s world-class credentials. He was also instrumental in the conception, design and building of Symphony Hall.  Ed has since worked with orchestras worldwide including the Toronto Symp
hony, the China National Sym
phony in Beijing and Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra where he appointed Gustavo Dudamel as Music Director in 2006. He returned to the UK after 6 years in Sweden to pursue a freelance career.

On Ed’s appointment, Michael Eakin, Liverpool Philharmonic’s Chief Executive said:  “Ed joins a fantastic senior team who have played a major part in driving our current achievements alongside our Chief Conductor, Vasily Petrenko, musicians and staff.  He brings with him a wealth of experience of working in the national and international orchestral sector at the highest level and will provide an important contribution to our strategic planning during this interim period.”

Ed added; “It’s wonderful to be back working with this great orchestra in this great hall after starting here 41 years ago. It’s an extraordinary coincidence that Deputy Orchestra Manager, Jane Moss recently returned here from working with orchestras in London – she typed my appointment letter in 1970! Liverpool attracts! I’m looking forward to working with Michael, his colleagues and the musicians in ensuring that symphonic music thrives as it always has done in this great city.”

More about Ed Smith at www.edsmithconsulting.com

Here are ten classical music stories broken by Slipped Disc in the past year, most of them hours and sometimes a full day ahead of the world’s mass media. Some are intrinsic to the music industry and of little interest outside the classical lily pond. Others have repercussions that are still running as the year ends.

Here’s the A list, with two stings in the tail:

1 Dudamel quits his agency – twice 
2 Tenor Philip Langridge dies
3 EMI loses two classical vice-presidents
4 Germany’s two top composers kiss and make up
5 Regime change at Deutsch Grammophon: crossover Roberts gets the push
6 Both main BBC orchestras lose their chief conductors
7 Linda Brava returns – fully clothed
8 Sony grabs pound of flesh from new signings
9 Rigged entries at the Solti Conducting Competition
10 Lang Lang’s lips are forcibly sealed
…. and the year’s most talked about classical music email
Much more to come in the year ahead

Yes, you read it right. A real-life classical conductor is going on prime US network television at the start of the New Year. He might even get to talk about music (perhaps not at symphonic length). When, since Leonard Bernstein in 1943, has any young conductor received such national exposure?

It’s a huge step-up for Gustavo Dudamel to the next celebrity rung. I reckon he can handle it.
Here’s the press release, hot off the email:

 

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC MUSIC DIRECTOR

GUSTAVO DUDAMEL TO APPEAR ON NBC’S

“THE TONIGHT SHOW WITH JAY LENO”

 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 4, 2011, AT 11:35 PM

 

 

WHAT:              LA Phil Music Director Gustavo Dudamel guests on NBC’s “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” Tuesday, January 4, 2011, at 11:35 p.m. In his first appearance on the national late-night program, Dudamel discusses, among other topics, LA Phil LIVE, which sends full-concert performances of him leading the Los Angeles Philharmonic at Walt Disney Concert Hall to more than 450 movie theaters across the U.S. and Canada.

 

Dudamel is currently in the middle of his second season leading the LA Phil. The LA Phil’s 2010/11 season presents a vast spectrum of imaginative concerts – welcoming back old friends, while continuing the tradition of introducing rising artists and composers – a European tour and expansion of YOLA (Youth Orchestra Los Angeles), Dudamel’s signature music education program.

 

“The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” is from Big Dog Productions in association with Universal Media Studios.  Debbie Vickers is the executive producer.

 

For artwork from “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” please visit the NBC press website at www.nbcumv.com or contact julie.true@nbcuni.com.  For embed codes from “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” please visit http://www.nbc.com/the-tonight-show/video/.

 

Please visit www.LAPhil.com for complete programming information.

Gustavo Dudamel has told the Los Angeles Times that he and his wife, Eloísa Maturén, are expecting a baby next spring. ‘I will be Papa!’ he cried. The paper then obtained confirmation from Deborah Borda, president of the LA Philharmonic – just in case he’d got it wrong.

Here’s the link and here’s the happy couple (Dude and Mrs, not Dude and Debs).

Photo credit: Susana Gonzales / Los Angeles Times

 

Dudamel

 

 

Gustavo Dudamel has told the Los Angeles Times that he and his wife, Eloísa Maturén, are expecting a baby next spring. ‘I will be Papa!’ he cried. The paper then obtained confirmation from Deborah Borda, president of the LA Philharmonic – just in case he’d got it wrong.

Here’s the link and here’s the happy couple (Dude and Mrs, not Dude and Debs).

Photo credit: Susana Gonzales / Los Angeles Times

 

Dudamel