When Andrzej Panufnik fled Warsaw in 1954 he became a non-person almost for the rest of his life.

Over the past quarter-century his music has been performed more and more, but there was still no public acknowledgement of his cultural importance.

That omission was aptly remedied today.

panufnik avenue2

Lady Camilla Panufnki and her son Jem Panufnik after the naming of the Andrzej Panufnik avenue in the Mokotow district of Warsaw. The avenue of trees leads to Andrzej’s grandparents’ beautiful old house, Palaczyk Szuster, which is now a centre for young musiciansThe President of Warsaw, Mrs. Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz,  presided over the event in front of a distinguished audience, and the 4-trumpet fanfare from Panufnik’s Sinfonia Sacra was performed by musicians of the Warsaw Philharmonic as the ribbon was cut.

panufnik avenue

 

Over the past couple of months I have been hearing of orchestras taking longer and longer to pay musicians on return from overseas tours. One of the culprits was the London Mozart Players, an excellent chamber orchestra based in the southern satellite town of Croydon. 

LMP are now telling us why. In an interview with Gigmag, managing director Simon Funnell issues an emergency £50,000 appeal for private philanthropy to stave off a budget shortfall caused by Croydon council cuts. The Arts Council were typically unhelpful.
Prince Edward is leading the cash campaign. I hope he comes up with the goods. LMP, conducted by Gerard Korsten, with Roxanna Panufnik as composer in residence, is the only orchestra serving the southern London conurbations. If LMP were out of action, Croydon should know there would be little point in going ahead with a planned refurbishment of Fairfield Halls. It will have so many dark nights, it might as well be boarded up.
Press release below:

PRESS RELEASE
After more than 60 years the London Mozart Players announces that it is today launching a campaign to secure its future.
The orchestra has worked hard to replace the loss of its Arts Council core funding in 2008. But more is needed. The LMP’s Managing Director, Simon Funnell, said: “This campaign is urgent and vital – if we don’t succeed it is highly likely that the board will have to take the decision to close the orchestra later this year so the stakes are very high indeed. The LMP is one of the finest chamber orchestras in the country and it is crucial that we protect this part of our heritage.”
Simon Funnell continued: “Many arts organisations face challenging times in the coming years; thanks to the deep impact of the recession, Government cuts to the Arts Council, low interest rates and a gloomy outlook on the economy, the orchestra is facing a squeeze on every side: there are more organisations chasing smaller and smaller pots of money.
“Every time we lose a cultural institution like the LMP, we lose something of our humanity and we cannot allow this to happen. The sums of money the LMP need to survive are relatively small but vital if the orchestra is to survive. The government is calling on philanthropists and companies to do more to support the arts, and now the LMP is asking directly f

or that support.”

Over the last two years, the LMP has embarked on an ambitious programme of development, appointing an outstanding music director in Gérard Korsten who has already taken the LMP to new heights, as well as a new Associate Composer, Roxanna Panufnik. The orchestra continues to garner critical acclaim for the almost one hundred concerts, tours and recordings it undertakes each year:
The orchestra’s work off-stage, LMP Interactive, is also highly regarded, with over one hundred projects run each year. In Croydon the LMP has worked with around 30 schools and last year reached almost 3800 children and adults through its community and education work. The orchestra has pioneered cross-generational projects involving both young people and the elderly, was nominated for an RPS award for its “Orchestra in a Village” project at the Cambridge Music Festival and has worked this year with the Princes Foundation for Children & the Arts as well as Orchestras Live and Turner Sims Concert Hall on projects for young people. It was recently nominated for a South Bank Sky Arts Award for its work with Portsmouth Grammar School and the composer Tansy Davies.
The orchestra’s principal funder Croydon Council has continued to support the orchestra through these difficult times and the orchestra’s management cannot thank the Council highly enough for its generosity. The orchestra realises that it cannot expect the council, or the tax payers of Croydon, to be the only funders of an orchestra which works across the country and abroad. The LMP is delighted to have an ongoing relationship both with Croydon Council and with Fairfield Halls both of whom are strong supporters of the orchestra. But the LMP recognises the need to complement this with broader philanthropic support.
The orchestra’s formal appeal will be launched by the orchestra’s Associate Conductor Hilary Davan Wetton at the orchestra’s concert at Fairfield Halls, 7.30pm on Wednesday 20 April 2011.
– ENDS –
For more information contact Simon Funnell, Managing Director, London Mozart Players on 020 8686 1996 or email simon@lmp.org
Press tickets for Wednesday night’s concert are available by emailing Caroline Molloy: caroline@lmp.org

The English Music Festival is launching its own record label with unperformed and under-performed music by indigenous composers, starting with world premieres of violin sonatas by Sir Arthur Bliss and Sir Walford Davies.

All jolly nice, green and pleasant, any other cliché you care to pluck. EMF appends a list (press release below) of all the decent chaps they are dusting off for public reconsideration. All are English as teacakes and, in many cases, twice as insipid. Not a dissonance, or a foreign accent, among them.
Where, you wonder, is the variety, the receptivity, the generosity of the English spirit? With the exception of Gustav Holst, who was of part-Swedish parentage, all the composers on the label are mutton-chops bulldog breed, representing an Olde England that no longer exists and maybe never did. There were always minorities in the land, boosted by invigorating waves of refugees. 
None of that infusion is discernible here. None of the gifted and influential Hitler refugees – Goldschmidt, Reizenstein, Wellesz, Gal – nor any of the Stalin fugitives who made their lives in this country and enhanced ours – Panufnik, Seiber, Serly and more. All erased by EMF.
The selection is not so much anachronistic as borderline offensive. If this label were a political party, it would be isolated and banned. EMF needs to rewrite its credentials, fast.
English Composers

NEWS RELEASE

  

New record
label revives overlooked works by British composers

 

This spring sees the launch of a
new record label devoted exclusively to English music – EM Records – whose
debut album includes
two major world-première recordings.

 

The
Violin Sonatas by
Arthur Bliss and
Henry Walford Davies have languished in manuscript form for over 100 years.
They were both given their première concert performances by Rupert Luck and
Matthew Rickard at the 2010 English Music Festival in Oxfordshire, and were
given a rapturous reception by an enthralled Festival audience.  EM Records presents these two passionate and
heartfelt Sonatas alongside the opulent and darkly turbulent Violin Sonata by
York
Bowen
.

 

The new record company has been set
up in association with the English Music Festival (www.englishmusicfestival.org.uk).

 

The company’s Managing Director, Em
Marshall (also founder of the English Music Festival), describes the mission of
EM Records as “fulfilling the EMF’s goal of celebrating and preserving
neglected works by British composers, especially those from the early years of
the twentieth century – the ‘golden renaissance’ of English music.”

 

She says the company “will release
a mixture of live recordings from the Festival together with studio recordings,
giving listeners the chance to experience the fullest possible range of the EMF’s
work. In keeping with the unique spirit of the Festival each disc released by
EM Records will contain at least one world première recording. We want to ensure that no English works worthy of
hearing are ever again left unavailable to listeners.”

 

EM Records is a ground-breaking enterprise, presenting
repertoire that, though previously unrecorded, is vital, vivid and powerful;
and, through its commitment to this endeavour, complements the pioneering work
of a leading and internationally-acclaimed Festival.

 

Plans
are already underway for future releases. These include the World Première
recording of

Gustav Holst’s The Coming of Christ (which received its first contemporary performance in
the

2010
EMF) performed by the City of London Choir under Hilary Davan Wetton; and a
recording of

Roger Quilter’s piano music, performed by David Owen Norris. Also
forthcoming is a live recording, to be made at the 2011 Festival, of part-songs
by
Rawsthorne, Haydn Wood, Robin Milford, Finzi and Holst, performed by the Syred Consort
under their conductor, Ben Palmer.

 

Contact Em Marshall, Director, EM
Records, for more information or interview. em.marshall@btinternet.com 

www.englishmusicfestival.org.uk/emrecords.html   

 

-ENDS-

The English Music Festival is launching its own record label with unperformed and under-performed music by indigenous composers, starting with world premieres of violin sonatas by Sir Arthur Bliss and Sir Walford Davies.

All jolly nice, green and pleasant, any other cliché you care to pluck. EMF appends a list (press release below) of all the decent chaps they are dusting off for public reconsideration. All are English as teacakes and, in many cases, twice as insipid. Not a dissonance, or a foreign accent, among them.
Where, you wonder, is the variety, the receptivity, the generosity of the English spirit? With the exception of Gustav Holst, who was of part-Swedish parentage, all the composers on the label are mutton-chops bulldog breed, representing an Olde England that no longer exists and maybe never did. There were always minorities in the land, boosted by invigorating waves of refugees. 
None of that infusion is discernible here. None of the gifted and influential Hitler refugees – Goldschmidt, Reizenstein, Wellesz, Gal – nor any of the Stalin fugitives who made their lives in this country and enhanced ours – Panufnik, Seiber, Serly and more. All erased by EMF.
The selection is not so much anachronistic as borderline offensive. If this label were a political party, it would be isolated and banned. EMF needs to rewrite its credentials, fast.
English Composers

NEWS RELEASE

  

New record
label revives overlooked works by British composers

 

This spring sees the launch of a
new record label devoted exclusively to English music – EM Records – whose
debut album includes
two major world-première recordings.

 

The
Violin Sonatas by
Arthur Bliss and
Henry Walford Davies have languished in manuscript form for over 100 years.
They were both given their première concert performances by Rupert Luck and
Matthew Rickard at the 2010 English Music Festival in Oxfordshire, and were
given a rapturous reception by an enthralled Festival audience.  EM Records presents these two passionate and
heartfelt Sonatas alongside the opulent and darkly turbulent Violin Sonata by
York
Bowen
.

 

The new record company has been set
up in association with the English Music Festival (www.englishmusicfestival.org.uk).

 

The company’s Managing Director, Em
Marshall (also founder of the English Music Festival), describes the mission of
EM Records as “fulfilling the EMF’s goal of celebrating and preserving
neglected works by British composers, especially those from the early years of
the twentieth century – the ‘golden renaissance’ of English music.”

 

She says the company “will release
a mixture of live recordings from the Festival together with studio recordings,
giving listeners the chance to experience the fullest possible range of the EMF’s
work. In keeping with the unique spirit of the Festival each disc released by
EM Records will contain at least one world première recording. We want to ensure that no English works worthy of
hearing are ever again left unavailable to listeners.”

 

EM Records is a ground-breaking enterprise, presenting
repertoire that, though previously unrecorded, is vital, vivid and powerful;
and, through its commitment to this endeavour, complements the pioneering work
of a leading and internationally-acclaimed Festival.

 

Plans
are already underway for future releases. These include the World Première
recording of

Gustav Holst’s The Coming of Christ (which received its first contemporary performance in
the

2010
EMF) performed by the City of London Choir under Hilary Davan Wetton; and a
recording of

Roger Quilter’s piano music, performed by David Owen Norris. Also
forthcoming is a live recording, to be made at the 2011 Festival, of part-songs
by
Rawsthorne, Haydn Wood, Robin Milford, Finzi and Holst, performed by the Syred Consort
under their conductor, Ben Palmer.

 

Contact Em Marshall, Director, EM
Records, for more information or interview. em.marshall@btinternet.com 

www.englishmusicfestival.org.uk/emrecords.html   

 

-ENDS-