Placido Domingo has announced he is giving a concert in Rio during the soccer World Cup finals. It will be the seventh time he has adorned the tournament, going all the way back to the original Three Tenors concert in 1990.

He will be joined by the pianist Lang Lang and soprano Anamaria Martinez.

domingo rio

Some months ago I relayed a dolorous email from Cameron Carpenter’s agent. The self-styled Bad Boy of the Organ had gone missing. More specifically, he had given his agent the push and was off into the wide, wide world to make his fame and fortune.

Carpenter
photo by Dana Ross
Well, now we know where the naked organist has landed. A press release announces that Cameron’s cake has been cut in three chunks – CAMI for North America, KD Schmid for the rest of the world and Peters Edition for publishing his flamboyant arrangements. That’s how the future lines up for the hottest thing in the organ loft since Saint Cecilia, at least.
Carpenter
photo by Chris Owyoung, with styling by Maeri Hedstrom

Hmmmm…. maybe there’s more to the Bad Boy than meets the ear. It was shrewd of him to avoid becoming exclusively CAMI’s Cameron, as the former conductors agency is no longer the powerhouse it once was. And it was even sharper of him to plant a large footprint in Europe as a clever hedge against declining US attendances for classical variety acts.
As Cam himself puts it: “There could hardly be a better start to the New Year for a musician than to be simultaneously signed by both CAMI Music and Konzertdirektion Schmid. I’m thrilled that my work has the muscular advocacy of both Jean-Jacques Cesbron and Cornelia Schmid on a combined four continents.”

But that’s not quite the full story. CAMI’s Cesbron, who Cam credits above, spends most of his waking hours looking after – you guessed – Lang Lang. So the plot thickens. Suddenly the two flashiest finger men are under the same manager. What price a big duet? Or is that more like a duel? Here’s Lang Lang practising for the event, back home in Beijing.

                                                                                                                                                            press photo: AP

Full press release appears below
—————————————————————————————————————–

PROVOCATIVE ORGANIST-COMPOSER

CAMERON CARPENTER KICKS OFF 2011

WITH NEW MANAGEMENT, PREMIERE OF MAJOR COMMISSION,

PUBLISHING CONTRACT
 

Virtuoso Recently Profiled on CBS Sunday Morning;

Global Management By CAMI Music and Konzertdirektion Schmid

 

[New York, NY] – Wherever Cameron Carpenter appears, he generates enormous excitement from audiences and critics alike; and as the only organist in the world filling concert halls from Berlin’s Philharmonie to Davies Hall in San Francisco, it’s clear he is now one of the industry’s most in-demand talents. On the heels of a recent U.S. national television profile on CBS Sunday Morning, the “Bad Boy of the Organ” (CBS) announces his new management team, solidifying his representation throughout the world: CAMI Music, LLC for North America and Asia, and Konzertdirektion Schmid for Europe, the United Kingdom, Scandinavia (including Nordic countries), New Zealand, and Australia.

 

“There could hardly be a better start to the New Year for a musician than to be simultaneously signed by both CAMI Music and Konzertdirektion Schmid,” says Carpenter. “I’m thrilled that my work has the muscular advocacy of both Jean-Jacques Cesbron and Cornelia Schmid on a combined four continents.”

 

Formed in 2004, CAMI Music specializes in the worldwide general management and touring of nearly 50 prominent artists, institutions and events across the worlds of theater, dance, and world, jazz, and classical music and beyond. Carpenter joins a roster including such superstars as Lang Lang, Seiji Ozawa, Maxim Vengerov, Howard Shore, Tan Dun, and the American Ballet Theatre.  Specifically, Cameron will join CAMI Music’s Instrumentalists as only the sixth artist in that elite group, alongside Lang Lang, Ray Chen, Khatia Buniatishvili, Mischa Maisky, and Vadim Repin.

“We are thrilled to bring an artist of Cameron’s stature to the roster,” said Jean-Jacques Cesbron, President of CAMI Music. “We are looking forward to introducing our clients to his phenomenal talent and ground-breaking vision of what the organ can do.” 

 

In addition, Cameron’s manager Tobias Tumarkin of CAMI Music adds “We are so excited to be working with Cameron and strongly believe that he will bring new fans to the organ and the wonderful repertoire, both classical and popular, that it provides.”

 

Konzertdirektion Schmid is Europe’s leading classical music management, well-known for handling the European careers of artists such as Yo-Yo Ma, Peter Serkin, Joshua Bell, Murray Perahia, Yefim Bronfman, Xavier de Maistre, Mitsuko Uchida, among others. Cameron is represented by Schmid associate Benedikt Carlberg as the sole organist on the Schmid roster.

 

“We instantly knew that Cameron Carpenter is an exceptional and brilliant artist from the very first moment he caught our attention. Not only because he plays the organ in a way nobody has done before – but particularly because of his deep understanding of the music and his absolute dedication to it,” saysCornelia Schmid, who manages the Konzertdirektion as President from their office in Hannover, Germany.

 

Carpenter, called a “smasher of cultural and classical music taboos” by the Los Angeles Times, started 2011 with the world premiere of The Scandal, a major 30-minute work for organ and orchestra composed by Carpenter and commissioned by the Cologne Philharmonie (KölnMusic GmbH). This was the first major event under Carpenter’s new relationship with world-renowned publishing house Edition Peters, which has signed the composer to an exclusive worldwide publishing contract. Edition Peters, which has already published Carpenter’s Aria, Opus 1 for solo organ and will soon release his Serenade and Fugue on B.A.C.H as Opus 2, will publish The Scandal in two versions, both as Carpenter’s Opus 3 (for organ and full orchestra) and Opus 3a (for organ and expanded chamber orchestra, as premiered in Cologne).

 

The Scandalwith Carpenter in the solo organ role, debuted on New Year’s Day 2011 at the Philharmonie in Cologne, Germany with the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie under the direction of Alexander Shelley. Lauded by press and audiences alike, the performance garnered such praise as from Germany’s Die Welt: “Carpenter…is proving himself to be a clever eclecticist, who understands to entertain with much finesse.”

 

“I’m honored to watch Edition Peters launching my career as a composer. With the publication ofThe Scandal, Op. 3 in 2011, I hope to begin an ongoing expansion of the secular organ repertoire, particularly in major works for organ and orchestra,” says Carpenter.

 

For more information on Cameron Carpenter, including his most recently released CD/DVD set Cameron Live! (Telarc, 2010), visit www.cameroncarpenter.com.

 

Cameron Carpenter

Cameron Carpenter is a dazzling performer and showman, but these are just the first impressions to be had from a diverse and prolific artist. Encompassing the organ in all its iterations – pipe, virtual, classical, and popular – Cameron’s unique voice is emerging as a revolutionary in his field, while still evolving. This exorbitant virtuoso is renowned not only for his playing of the great organ works, but also for his compositions which – in their emphasis on color, secularity, and performative freedom – follow in the footsteps of Percy Grainger, Sigfrid Karg-Elert, and Leopold Godowsky. The 29-year-old (first ever) Grammy®-nominated organist has already performed widely in the U.S. and abroad, and arranges prolifically for the organ (from Chopin’s Études and piano masterworks of Liszt, Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, Medtner, etc., to contemporary pop music and scores from Japanese animé).

“No other musician of Carpenter’s generation has more adeptly fused shrewd showmanship, dazzling technique and profound thinking about his instrument and his place in the musical cosmos…” – San Francisco Chronicle

 

Contact:

For Media requests:

Amanda Sweet/Bucklesweet Media Amanda@Bucklesweetmedia.com 347-564-3371

 

For CAMI Music: Tobias Tumarkin Tumarkin@camimusic.com

 

For KD Schmid: Benedikt Carlberg benedikt.carlberg@kdschmid.de

 

Some months ago I relayed a dolorous email from Cameron Carpenter’s agent. The self-styled Bad Boy of the Organ had gone missing. More specifically, he had given his agent the push and was off into the wide, wide world to make his fame and fortune.

Carpenter
photo by Dana Ross
Well, now we know where the naked organist has landed. A press release announces that Cameron’s cake has been cut in three chunks – CAMI for North America, KD Schmid for the rest of the world and Peters Edition for publishing his flamboyant arrangements. That’s how the future lines up for the hottest thing in the organ loft since Saint Cecilia, at least.
Carpenter
photo by Chris Owyoung, with styling by Maeri Hedstrom

Hmmmm…. maybe there’s more to the Bad Boy than meets the ear. It was shrewd of him to avoid becoming exclusively CAMI’s Cameron, as the former conductors agency is no longer the powerhouse it once was. And it was even sharper of him to plant a large footprint in Europe as a clever hedge against declining US attendances for classical variety acts.
As Cam himself puts it: “There could hardly be a better start to the New Year for a musician than to be simultaneously signed by both CAMI Music and Konzertdirektion Schmid. I’m thrilled that my work has the muscular advocacy of both Jean-Jacques Cesbron and Cornelia Schmid on a combined four continents.”

But that’s not quite the full story. CAMI’s Cesbron, who Cam credits above, spends most of his waking hours looking after – you guessed – Lang Lang. So the plot thickens. Suddenly the two flashiest finger men are under the same manager. What price a big duet? Or is that more like a duel? Here’s Lang Lang practising for the event, back home in Beijing.

                                                                                                                                                            press photo: AP

Full press release appears below
—————————————————————————————————————–

PROVOCATIVE ORGANIST-COMPOSER

CAMERON CARPENTER KICKS OFF 2011

WITH NEW MANAGEMENT, PREMIERE OF MAJOR COMMISSION,

PUBLISHING CONTRACT
 

Virtuoso Recently Profiled on CBS Sunday Morning;

Global Management By CAMI Music and Konzertdirektion Schmid

 

[New York, NY] – Wherever Cameron Carpenter appears, he generates enormous excitement from audiences and critics alike; and as the only organist in the world filling concert halls from Berlin’s Philharmonie to Davies Hall in San Francisco, it’s clear he is now one of the industry’s most in-demand talents. On the heels of a recent U.S. national television profile on CBS Sunday Morning, the “Bad Boy of the Organ” (CBS) announces his new management team, solidifying his representation throughout the world: CAMI Music, LLC for North America and Asia, and Konzertdirektion Schmid for Europe, the United Kingdom, Scandinavia (including Nordic countries), New Zealand, and Australia.

 

“There could hardly be a better start to the New Year for a musician than to be simultaneously signed by both CAMI Music and Konzertdirektion Schmid,” says Carpenter. “I’m thrilled that my work has the muscular advocacy of both Jean-Jacques Cesbron and Cornelia Schmid on a combined four continents.”

 

Formed in 2004, CAMI Music specializes in the worldwide general management and touring of nearly 50 prominent artists, institutions and events across the worlds of theater, dance, and world, jazz, and classical music and beyond. Carpenter joins a roster including such superstars as Lang Lang, Seiji Ozawa, Maxim Vengerov, Howard Shore, Tan Dun, and the American Ballet Theatre.  Specifically, Cameron will join CAMI Music’s Instrumentalists as only the sixth artist in that elite group, alongside Lang Lang, Ray Chen, Khatia Buniatishvili, Mischa Maisky, and Vadim Repin.

“We are thrilled to bring an artist of Cameron’s stature to the roster,” said Jean-Jacques Cesbron, President of CAMI Music. “We are looking forward to introducing our clients to his phenomenal talent and ground-breaking vision of what the organ can do.” 

 

In addition, Cameron’s manager Tobias Tumarkin of CAMI Music adds “We are so excited to be working with Cameron and strongly believe that he will bring new fans to the organ and the wonderful repertoire, both classical and popular, that it provides.”

 

Konzertdirektion Schmid is Europe’s leading classical music management, well-known for handling the European careers of artists such as Yo-Yo Ma, Peter Serkin, Joshua Bell, Murray Perahia, Yefim Bronfman, Xavier de Maistre, Mitsuko Uchida, among others. Cameron is represented by Schmid associate Benedikt Carlberg as the sole organist on the Schmid roster.

 

“We instantly knew that Cameron Carpenter is an exceptional and brilliant artist from the very first moment he caught our attention. Not only because he plays the organ in a way nobody has done before – but particularly because of his deep understanding of the music and his absolute dedication to it,” saysCornelia Schmid, who manages the Konzertdirektion as President from their office in Hannover, Germany.

 

Carpenter, called a “smasher of cultural and classical music taboos” by the Los Angeles Times, started 2011 with the world premiere of The Scandal, a major 30-minute work for organ and orchestra composed by Carpenter and commissioned by the Cologne Philharmonie (KölnMusic GmbH). This was the first major event under Carpenter’s new relationship with world-renowned publishing house Edition Peters, which has signed the composer to an exclusive worldwide publishing contract. Edition Peters, which has already published Carpenter’s Aria, Opus 1 for solo organ and will soon release his Serenade and Fugue on B.A.C.H as Opus 2, will publish The Scandal in two versions, both as Carpenter’s Opus 3 (for organ and full orchestra) and Opus 3a (for organ and expanded chamber orchestra, as premiered in Cologne).

 

The Scandalwith Carpenter in the solo organ role, debuted on New Year’s Day 2011 at the Philharmonie in Cologne, Germany with the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie under the direction of Alexander Shelley. Lauded by press and audiences alike, the performance garnered such praise as from Germany’s Die Welt: “Carpenter…is proving himself to be a clever eclecticist, who understands to entertain with much finesse.”

 

“I’m honored to watch Edition Peters launching my career as a composer. With the publication ofThe Scandal, Op. 3 in 2011, I hope to begin an ongoing expansion of the secular organ repertoire, particularly in major works for organ and orchestra,” says Carpenter.

 

For more information on Cameron Carpenter, including his most recently released CD/DVD set Cameron Live! (Telarc, 2010), visit www.cameroncarpenter.com.

 

Cameron Carpenter

Cameron Carpenter is a dazzling performer and showman, but these are just the first impressions to be had from a diverse and prolific artist. Encompassing the organ in all its iterations – pipe, virtual, classical, and popular – Cameron’s unique voice is emerging as a revolutionary in his field, while still evolving. This exorbitant virtuoso is renowned not only for his playing of the great organ works, but also for his compositions which – in their emphasis on color, secularity, and performative freedom – follow in the footsteps of Percy Grainger, Sigfrid Karg-Elert, and Leopold Godowsky. The 29-year-old (first ever) Grammy®-nominated organist has already performed widely in the U.S. and abroad, and arranges prolifically for the organ (from Chopin’s Études and piano masterworks of Liszt, Scriabin, Rachmaninoff, Medtner, etc., to contemporary pop music and scores from Japanese animé).

“No other musician of Carpenter’s generation has more adeptly fused shrewd showmanship, dazzling technique and profound thinking about his instrument and his place in the musical cosmos…” – San Francisco Chronicle

 

Contact:

For Media requests:

Amanda Sweet/Bucklesweet Media Amanda@Bucklesweetmedia.com 347-564-3371

 

For CAMI Music: Tobias Tumarkin Tumarkin@camimusic.com

 

For KD Schmid: Benedikt Carlberg benedikt.carlberg@kdschmid.de

 

Here are ten classical music stories broken by Slipped Disc in the past year, most of them hours and sometimes a full day ahead of the world’s mass media. Some are intrinsic to the music industry and of little interest outside the classical lily pond. Others have repercussions that are still running as the year ends.

Here’s the A list, with two stings in the tail:

1 Dudamel quits his agency – twice 
2 Tenor Philip Langridge dies
3 EMI loses two classical vice-presidents
4 Germany’s two top composers kiss and make up
5 Regime change at Deutsch Grammophon: crossover Roberts gets the push
6 Both main BBC orchestras lose their chief conductors
7 Linda Brava returns – fully clothed
8 Sony grabs pound of flesh from new signings
9 Rigged entries at the Solti Conducting Competition
10 Lang Lang’s lips are forcibly sealed
…. and the year’s most talked about classical music email
Much more to come in the year ahead

More than 20 years after German reunification, the emblematic Universal-owned yellow label is finally being transferred from Hamburg to Berlin, it was announced today.

The move has been fiercely resisted by label diehards and was accomplished only after the removal of the universally unpopular Universal president of classical and jazz, Chris Roberts.

Contrary to heavy Hamburg rumours all week long, Universal has officially confirmed that DG will remain under the presidency of Roberts’s trusted placeman, Michael Lang. See also here.

So at least they are left with half a Lang, the other half having fled to Sony.

 

——————————-

And here’s the corporate press release, hot off the machine:

Embargoed until October 14th, 12:45 pm (11:45 am London time)

 

 

Classical music leader Deutsche Grammophon relocates to Berlin

 

Berlin/Hamburg, 14 October 2010 – Deutsche Grammophon, the world’s leading classical music company, is moving from Hamburg to Berlin.  This follows the earlier relocation of its parent company, Universal Music Germany, in 2002.

 

In future, Deutsche Grammophon will operate as an autonomous label from Universal Music’s German headquarters in the Osthafen district of Berlin. The move will take place in the summer of 2011. The news was announced today (14) by Frank Briegmann, President, Universal Music Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Deutsche Grammophon, and by Deutsche Grammophon President Michael Lang.


Frank Briegmann has been leading Universal Music Germany for the past six years, and in July 2010 added responsibility for Universal Music’s companies in Austria and Switzerland, and for the worldwide operations of Deutsche Grammophon.

 

“For more than a century of its remarkable history, the right balance between innovation and tradition has been one of the key factors in Deutsche Grammophon’s continued success”, said  Mr. Briegmann.  “The calibre of such artists as Anne-Sophie Mutter, Gustavo Dudamel, Hélène Grimaud and Hilary Hahn – as well as newly signed names such as Alice Sara Ott, Miloš Karadagli? and Mojca Erdmann – and their recordings will always be the company’s heart and soul. 

 

 “By bringing Deutsche Grammophon to Berlin, we are facilitating even closer cooperation within our business, and securing the future success of the most renowned and established classical label in the world.  As he has for many years, Michael Lang will continue to be operationally responsible for Deutsche Grammophon, upholding the standards of excellence for which it is celebrated, and maintaining the continuity of our relationships with artists and business partners alike.  Apart from that, this move strengthens Berlin as a centre of gravity for music, and particularly for classical music.”

Mr. Briegmann continued, “Target audiences are changing. Innovative strategies in marketing and distribution are becoming increasingly important and new types of artists require fresh thinking and action, for example, pop superstar Sting is accompanied by the London Symphony Orchestra, star violinist David Garrett, whose roots are in classical music, releases ‘Rock Symphonies’, opera tenor Rolando Villazón newly interprets Mexican folk music, and Anna Netrebko becomes a household name beyond the traditional audience for classical music.”

 

Deutsche Grammophon was founded in Hanover in 1898 by brothers Emile and Joseph Berliner, making it the oldest point of origin of the Universal Music Group, the world’s leading music company.  In Hamburg, Deutsche Grammophon has been based for more than 50 years. The label is the unchallenged leader in classical music, with 80% of its revenue generated abroad, mostly in the US, Japan and France.

 

Deutsche Grammophon is known for an uncompromising attitude to quality and an innovative approach to marketing.  Its roster has always featured the most celebrated and influential artists in classical music, among them:  Claudio Abbado, Leonard Bernstein, Rafal Blechacz, Enrico Caruso, Gustavo Dudamel, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Elina Garanca, Hélène Grimaud, Hilary Hahn, Daniel Hope, Herbert von Karajan, Wilhelm Kempff, Anne-Sophie Mutter, Anna Netrebko, Maurizio Pollini, Thomas Quasthoff and Rolando Villazón.

 

Apart from its artists and music, Deutsche Grammophon can look back on a remarkable technological history.  Co-founder Emile Berliner is regarded as one of the inventors of the gramophone and the gramophone record.  Since that breakthrough, the company has continued to innovate:  releasing the first double-sided record, producing the first complete recording of an orchestral work in 1913 (Ludwig van Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, played by the Berlin Philharmonic and conducted by Arthur Nikisch), recording only on magnetic tape from 1946, starting the first industrial CD production in 1982, releasing laser discs and becoming the first classical label to sell recordings through its own online web shop.

 

More than 20 years after German reunification, the emblematic Universal-owned yellow label is finally being transferred from Hamburg to Berlin, it was announced today.

The move has been fiercely resisted by label diehards and was accomplished only after the removal of the universally unpopular Universal president of classical and jazz, Chris Roberts.

Contrary to heavy Hamburg rumours all week long, Universal has officially confirmed that DG will remain under the presidency of Roberts’s trusted placeman, Michael Lang. See also here.

So at least they are left with half a Lang, the other half having fled to Sony.

 

——————————-

And here’s the corporate press release, hot off the machine:

Embargoed until October 14th, 12:45 pm (11:45 am London time)

 

 

Classical music leader Deutsche Grammophon relocates to Berlin

 

Berlin/Hamburg, 14 October 2010 – Deutsche Grammophon, the world’s leading classical music company, is moving from Hamburg to Berlin.  This follows the earlier relocation of its parent company, Universal Music Germany, in 2002.

 

In future, Deutsche Grammophon will operate as an autonomous label from Universal Music’s German headquarters in the Osthafen district of Berlin. The move will take place in the summer of 2011. The news was announced today (14) by Frank Briegmann, President, Universal Music Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Deutsche Grammophon, and by Deutsche Grammophon President Michael Lang.


Frank Briegmann has been leading Universal Music Germany for the past six years, and in July 2010 added responsibility for Universal Music’s companies in Austria and Switzerland, and for the worldwide operations of Deutsche Grammophon.

 

“For more than a century of its remarkable history, the right balance between innovation and tradition has been one of the key factors in Deutsche Grammophon’s continued success”, said  Mr. Briegmann.  “The calibre of such artists as Anne-Sophie Mutter, Gustavo Dudamel, Hélène Grimaud and Hilary Hahn – as well as newly signed names such as Alice Sara Ott, Miloš Karadagli? and Mojca Erdmann – and their recordings will always be the company’s heart and soul. 

 

 “By bringing Deutsche Grammophon to Berlin, we are facilitating even closer cooperation within our business, and securing the future success of the most renowned and established classical label in the world.  As he has for many years, Michael Lang will continue to be operationally responsible for Deutsche Grammophon, upholding the standards of excellence for which it is celebrated, and maintaining the continuity of our relationships with artists and business partners alike.  Apart from that, this move strengthens Berlin as a centre of gravity for music, and particularly for classical music.”

Mr. Briegmann continued, “Target audiences are changing. Innovative strategies in marketing and distribution are becoming increasingly important and new types of artists require fresh thinking and action, for example, pop superstar Sting is accompanied by the London Symphony Orchestra, star violinist David Garrett, whose roots are in classical music, releases ‘Rock Symphonies’, opera tenor Rolando Villazón newly interprets Mexican folk music, and Anna Netrebko becomes a household name beyond the traditional audience for classical music.”

 

Deutsche Grammophon was founded in Hanover in 1898 by brothers Emile and Joseph Berliner, making it the oldest point of origin of the Universal Music Group, the world’s leading music company.  In Hamburg, Deutsche Grammophon has been based for more than 50 years. The label is the unchallenged leader in classical music, with 80% of its revenue generated abroad, mostly in the US, Japan and France.

 

Deutsche Grammophon is known for an uncompromising attitude to quality and an innovative approach to marketing.  Its roster has always featured the most celebrated and influential artists in classical music, among them:  Claudio Abbado, Leonard Bernstein, Rafal Blechacz, Enrico Caruso, Gustavo Dudamel, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Elina Garanca, Hélène Grimaud, Hilary Hahn, Daniel Hope, Herbert von Karajan, Wilhelm Kempff, Anne-Sophie Mutter, Anna Netrebko, Maurizio Pollini, Thomas Quasthoff and Rolando Villazón.

 

Apart from its artists and music, Deutsche Grammophon can look back on a remarkable technological history.  Co-founder Emile Berliner is regarded as one of the inventors of the gramophone and the gramophone record.  Since that breakthrough, the company has continued to innovate:  releasing the first double-sided record, producing the first complete recording of an orchestral work in 1913 (Ludwig van Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, played by the Berlin Philharmonic and conducted by Arthur Nikisch), recording only on magnetic tape from 1946, starting the first industrial CD production in 1982, releasing laser discs and becoming the first classical label to sell recordings through its own online web shop.

 

Deutsche Grammophon has posted a happy birthday page for the Chinese pianist, Yundi Li.

http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/artist/biography?ART_ID=LIYUN

Have they forgotten they fired him last year, at Lang Lang’s insistence? Only for Lang Lang then to walk out on them and join Sony on a $3 million handshake.

Does no-one in these giant corporations talk to one another?

Yundi, by the way, is now with EMI.

 

 

 

 

 (picture credit: DG)

Deutsche Grammophon has posted a happy birthday page for the Chinese pianist, Yundi Li.

http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/artist/biography?ART_ID=LIYUN

Have they forgotten they fired him last year, at Lang Lang’s insistence? Only for Lang Lang then to walk out on them and join Sony on a $3 million handshake.

Does no-one in these giant corporations talk to one another?

Yundi, by the way, is now with EMI.

 

 

 

 

 (picture credit: DG)

Promotion, what promotion? fumes a well-known artists’ agent in an email this morning.

The artists have to pay for their own PR (and it doesn’t come cheap). They also pay for the photo in  the booklet and for the sleeve notes if they want them to be more than a hacked rehash of Grove Online.

Even more pernicious, Sony in particular has told certain soloists to get an orchestra that is paid for by a radio organisation. That means the label gets the entire production for nothing.

And yet it expects to take the bulk of any profits and a share in the artist’s live fees.

Extortionate, or what? 

I guess someone has to pay for Lang Lang’s $3 million golden hello.

Promotion, what promotion? fumes a well-known artists’ agent in an email this morning.

The artists have to pay for their own PR (and it doesn’t come cheap). They also pay for the photo in  the booklet and for the sleeve notes if they want them to be more than a hacked rehash of Grove Online.

Even more pernicious, Sony in particular has told certain soloists to get an orchestra that is paid for by a radio organisation. That means the label gets the entire production for nothing.

And yet it expects to take the bulk of any profits and a share in the artist’s live fees.

Extortionate, or what? 

I guess someone has to pay for Lang Lang’s $3 million golden hello.

No sooner did I reveal what Lang Lang is forbidden to talk about on live radio than Sony Corp launched a new music streaming system in Europe to challenge Apple on a new front. It’s called Qriocity and, like most gimmicks with silly names, it is unlikely to last long.

Bloomberg thought the timing and the marketing were both wrong. The main purpose of the European launch seems to be keeping the war with Apple alive until one side or other comes up with a killer app.

What this tribal skirmish means for Sony’s artist slaves is stricter discipline. Two radio producers have contacted me to say that not only is Lang Lang prevented from mentioning i-Pads and other Apple products, but presenters who interview him live on air are required to give a prior undertaking that they will not mention Apple devices in their questions.

If I am asked to agree to such self-censorship I will refuse. I urge others to join me. This may help keep Sony artists off air until the company comes to its senses. Sorry about that, Yo Yo.

No sooner did I reveal what Lang Lang is forbidden to talk about on live radio than Sony Corp launched a new music streaming system in Europe to challenge Apple on a new front. It’s called Qriocity and, like most gimmicks with silly names, it is unlikely to last long.

Bloomberg thought the timing and the marketing were both wrong. The main purpose of the European launch seems to be keeping the war with Apple alive until one side or other comes up with a killer app.

What this tribal skirmish means for Sony’s artist slaves is stricter discipline. Two radio producers have contacted me to say that not only is Lang Lang prevented from mentioning i-Pads and other Apple products, but presenters who interview him live on air are required to give a prior undertaking that they will not mention Apple devices in their questions.

If I am asked to agree to such self-censorship I will refuse. I urge others to join me. This may help keep Sony artists off air until the company comes to its senses. Sorry about that, Yo Yo.