gatti

 

 

It’s…. Gatti!

Daniele Gatti will take over from Mariss Jansons next year.

The Italian conductor, 53, was being pursued by two Italian opera houses, but probably took the view that he had served his time there as music director in Bolgona in the 1990s. He was also one of the candidates to take over at the Vienna State Opera.

The Concertgebouw have moved unusually fast to secure his signature.

Gatti is presently chief of the Orchestre National de France, an ensemble destabilised by political changes at Radio France. Amsterdam could be his escape route.

Among the leading conductors of his generation, Gatti has never yet led an orchestra of acknowledged world rank. This is a big step up for him. And for the Concertgebouw it is a return to the sunny atmosphere it enjoyed with a previousl Italian, Riccardo Chailly. Whether Gatti will, like Chailly, become a fluent Dutch speaker remains to be seen.

 

He has guested with the Concertgebouw over the past 10 years.

UPDATE:

press release:

 

Daniele Gatti has been appointed the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra’s new chief conductor, a post he will assume in 2016. The Italian maestro will thus be the seventh chief conductor in the orchestra’s history. He will be succeeding Mariss Jansons, who announced in April 2014 he was relinquishing the post of chief conductor; Maestro Jansons will be leading the RCO in that capacity for the last time on 20 March 2015.

Daniele Gatti has been appointed the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra’s new chief conductor, a post he will assume in 2016. The Italian maestro will thus be the seventh chief conductor in the orchestra’s history.

Daniele Gatti gave an astounding first performance as guest conductor with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in 2004 with works by Richard Strauss and Wagner. He has since been invited very regularly to return. Maestro Gatti’s concert performances are characterised by highly individual interpretations of the traditional orchestral repertoire and a fondness for less common works. Daniele Gatti has made several tours abroad with the orchestra. In 2013 he conducted Mahler’s Symphony No. 9 on several important European festivals. A CD featuring works by Berg performed by the RCO and Maestro Gatti has been released on the orchestra’s in-house label, RCO Live. He last appeared with the orchestra conducting Verdi’s Falstaff in a June 2014 production at the Dutch National Opera, garnering both public and critical acclaim.

The Executive Board, the Board of Directors and the musicians of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra are delighted that Maestro Gatti was willing to fill such an important position. Managing Director Jan Raes says, ‘The musicians and the management of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra look forward to a long and inspiring collaboration with the renowned conductor Daniele Gatti. It is with great conviction that the orchestra has chosen a partnership with a conductor embodying such passion, dedication and experience. This was readily apparent from the keen involvement ofthe orchestra members in the rigorous selection process.’

Chief-conductor Designate Daniele Gatti: ‘I am deeply  honoured to receive this invitation from one of the greatest and oldest orchestras in the world. I will do my very best to deserve it and to serve the music with the support of the musicians and the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra family.’

CONCERTS

On 27, 28 and 30 November 2014, Daniele Gatti conducts Mahler’s Symphony No. 6.

On 3, 4 and 6 December 2014, Daniele Gatti leads a concert programme with Artist in Residence Leoninas Kavakos as the soloist in Alban Berg’s Violin Concerto.

On 15 and 16 January 2014, Daniele Gatti conducts Mahler’s Symphony No. 3 with mezzo-soprano Christianne Stotijn.

Dutch Public Radio is auctioning off a baton used by Bernard Haitink when he was chief conductor of the Concertgebouw, an orchestra he says he will never conduct again.

Bids have just reached 390 Euros ($534) and there are two days to go.

Click here.

Baton Haitink

h/t: Dianne Winsor

There were broad grins all over Munich on Friday.

Mariss Jansons signed a new contract with the Bavarian Radio rochestra, taking him up to 2015.
Given that Mariss is also committed to the Concertgebouw and in perpetually parlous health, there were fears he might drop one band or the other.
Munich got him to sign first. That leaves Amsterdam biting its nails.
Both have set up their own CD labels to disseminate his work.

 

 

The performing arts in the Neth erlands are reeling from government plans to cut more than one-fifth of arts subsidies, with the brunt falling on the country’s excellent orchestras. Total savings estimated are 220 million Euros.

As many as 280 to 300 musicians’ jobs may go, affecting such international ensembles as the Rotterdam Philharmonic and the Residentie orchestra of The Hague to the point where their survival might be at stake. Tough times ahead for Yannick-Nézét-Séguin and Neeme Järvi.

The effect on the Concertgebouw orchestra is not yet known but the hall’s artistic director Anneke Hogensteijn has recently resigned.

In an unconected move, Dutch Radio has announced cutbacks in live classical concerts, shifting the relays to unsocial hours.

 

Here’s a couple of articles (in Dutch)

http://www.volkskrant.nl/binnenland/article1420217.ece/Omroeporkesten_vrezen_extra_bezuinigingen_nieuw_kabinet
http://www.dvhn.nl/nieuws/kunst/article6391835.ece/Bijl-in-de-cultuur

 

 

The performing arts in the Neth erlands are reeling from government plans to cut more than one-fifth of arts subsidies, with the brunt falling on the country’s excellent orchestras. Total savings estimated are 220 million Euros.

As many as 280 to 300 musicians’ jobs may go, affecting such international ensembles as the Rotterdam Philharmonic and the Residentie orchestra of The Hague to the point where their survival might be at stake. Tough times ahead for Yannick-Nézét-Séguin and Neeme Järvi.

The effect on the Concertgebouw orchestra is not yet known but the hall’s artistic director Anneke Hogensteijn has recently resigned.

In an unconected move, Dutch Radio has announced cutbacks in live classical concerts, shifting the relays to unsocial hours.

 

Here’s a couple of articles (in Dutch)

http://www.volkskrant.nl/binnenland/article1420217.ece/Omroeporkesten_vrezen_extra_bezuinigingen_nieuw_kabinet
http://www.dvhn.nl/nieuws/kunst/article6391835.ece/Bijl-in-de-cultuur

The conductor Riccardo Chailly, in the first of this year’s series of The Lebrecht Interview on BBC Radio 3, was slightly needled when I suggested he lacked the stomach for a fight, and perhaps the ultimate edge of ambition.

Chailly, 57, is music director of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. He was supposed to be director of the city opera as well, but he backed out when a new production chief was installed. Previously, he walked away from the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam after 15 years.

He has not ruled at La Scala, where his father was once artistic director, and he has never headed a US orchestra, despite early triumphs in Chicago. But his eyes lit up when I pressed the point and he specified that he was in talks with ‘one of the great American musical institutions’. Ronald Wilford, the CAMI boss, is now his personal agent and an announcement on Chailly in America can be expected before the leaves change hue.

No need to speculate which orchestra is in his sights. It’s the one whose chief conductor is prone to most cancellations.

No need, either, to doubt his aptitude. Chailly is, technically and imaginatively, one of the foremost living conductors. If I had to choose someone to conduct for my life, he would be first in the frame.

Still in his 50s, and slimmed down after a heart scare, Chailly is full of energy and ideas, fluent in English and wonderfully refreshing in his very lack of career calculation. I have always rated him above his noisier contemporaries. A winter job on the East Coast would be just the ticket to establish Riccardo Chailly where he has long belonged – at the very top.

You can hear The Lebrecht Interview tonight on Radio 3. See here for more information.

The conductor Riccardo Chailly, in the first of this year’s series of The Lebrecht Interview on BBC Radio 3, was slightly needled when I suggested he lacked the stomach for a fight, and perhaps the ultimate edge of ambition.

Chailly, 57, is music director of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra. He was supposed to be director of the city opera as well, but he backed out when a new production chief was installed. Previously, he walked away from the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam after 15 years.

He has not ruled at La Scala, where his father was once artistic director, and he has never headed a US orchestra, despite early triumphs in Chicago. But his eyes lit up when I pressed the point and he specified that he was in talks with ‘one of the great American musical institutions’. Ronald Wilford, the CAMI boss, is now his personal agent and an announcement on Chailly in America can be expected before the leaves change hue.

No need to speculate which orchestra is in his sights. It’s the one whose chief conductor is prone to most cancellations.

No need, either, to doubt his aptitude. Chailly is, technically and imaginatively, one of the foremost living conductors. If I had to choose someone to conduct for my life, he would be first in the frame.

Still in his 50s, and slimmed down after a heart scare, Chailly is full of energy and ideas, fluent in English and wonderfully refreshing in his very lack of career calculation. I have always rated him above his noisier contemporaries. A winter job on the East Coast would be just the ticket to establish Riccardo Chailly where he has long belonged – at the very top.

You can hear The Lebrecht Interview tonight on Radio 3. See here for more information.

Valery Gergiev’s idea of playing two Mahler symphonies in the same BBC Prom concert – the fourth before the interval and the fifth after – is a product of our special-offer times. If neon-strip retailers can accustom us to buying more than we want by pretending to give it away free, what’s to stop conductors cramming our heads with musical excess?

I can think of no obvious precedent or justification for doing two Mahler symphonies in the same concert. Mahler once performed the fourth symphony twice in the same Amsterdam concert after Willem Mengelberg advised him that the Dutch audience was reflective by nature and would appreciate the opportunity to review the work again, after an intermission drink.

On other occasions, he performed sections of two or three different works, usually some songs and a symphonic movement, but he did not (so far as I recall) ever conduct two symphonies in the same night. So what’s the point?

Well, Gergiev is a high-energy conductor who likes to perform Soviet-style Stakhanovite feats, beating all Kremlin targets and collecting his medal on the first of May. There is also an iconoclastic streak to the man, a desire to shatter western moulds and do things in his own inimitable way. He has a genuine fascination with Mahler’s personality and he is perfectly entitled to try something that never crossed the composer’s mind.

It is not, by any measure, a crass idea. There is much that appeals to me about pairing two symphonies that musicologists split into different periods of Mahler’s life – the fourth in his so-called Wunderhorn period, and the fifth in the middle span of non-vocal symphonies. Putting them together makes a nonsense of these academic categories, and I’m all in favour of that.

There is also great merit in hearing Mahler’s music sequentially. I once staged a performance in Stockholm of all ten symphonies in a day – played in the four-hand piano versions, and immensely revealing of the connective tissue in Mahler’s creative constitution. None of us who heard the set, start to finish, would ever hear Mahler again in the same way.

So, though I’m suspicious of the supermarket ethics and unconvinced by Gergiev’s hit-and-run tactics, I am really keen to hear two Mahler symphonies back to back on August 5th. Camilla Tilling is the soloist in Mahler 4 – I like that, too. See you there. 

Mariss Jansons, a rare sighting in the opera house, has been forced to cancel on the Vienna State Opera’s revival of Carmen for a bout of surgery that will put him out of action for the next 2-3 months.

Jansons, who heads the Amsterdam Concergebouw and the Bavarian Radio orchestra, is unlucky at opera. He suffered a heart attack while leading an Oslo Bohème in 1996 and, apart from a stunning Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk in Amsterdam, has little to show for his love of opera other than scratched plans. At 67, he has just renewed his Munich contract to 2012.

Stepping into the Vienna vacancy is Jansons’ only acknowledged pupil, the brilliant young Latvian condcutor Andris Nelsons, music director of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra. Nelsons, 31, is Vienna’s favourite standby. In June 2008 he took over Pique Dame from the cancer-stricken Seiji Ozawa, followed by Tosca and Madam Butterfly. The Vienna Phil liked him so much they booked him for a concert debut.

Press release follows.

———————————————————————————

 

 

Andris Nelsons springt für Mariss Jansons an der Wiener Staatsoper ein und dirigiert die Neueinstudierung von Bizets „Carmen”

Hannover, 19. April 2010. Am 3. Mai und an mehreren darauf folgenden Vorstellungen übernimmt Andris Nelsons die musikalische Leitung der Neueinstudierung von Bizets Carmen. Er springt für Mariss Jansons ein, der aus gesundheitlichen Gründen seine Mitwirkung absagen muss. Die Iszenierung ist mit Elina Garanca als Carmen, Anna Netrebko als Micaela, Massimo Giordano als Don José und Ildebrando D’Arcangelo als Escamillo hochkarätig besetzt.

„Ich hoffe aus tiefstem Herzen, dass es Mariss Jansons bald besser geht. Das ist im Moment das Wichtigste”, so Nelsons. „Natürlich fühle ich mich sehr geehrt und bin dankbar, dass Ioan Holender mich gefragt hat, für Maestro Jansons einzuspringen. Ich freue mich, diese wundervolle Oper zu dirigieren. Natürlich ist es eine große Herausforderung für mich, für Mariss Jansons zu dirigieren, den großartigsten Dirigenten aller Zeiten.”

Nelsons sprang im Juni 2008 an der Wiener Staatsoper für Seiji Ozawa ein  und übernahm „Pique Dame”, später dirigierte er „Tosca” und „Madame Butterfly”. Im Juli debütiert er mit „Lohengrin” bei den Bayreuther Festspielen. Sein Debüt bei den Wiener Philharmonikern folgt in der Saison 2012/2013

Pressekontakt:

Konzertdirektion Schmid, Nina Steinhart, Königstraße 36, 30175 Hannover,