Barbican Centre appeals for donations

The City-funded London arts centre says it will not reopen before July 1 at the earliest.

As an organisation, we rely on ticket sales and your enduring support and generosity to be able to present and share our programme with you and thousands of others. We’re all finding ourselves in completely new territory, which presents a real financial challenge for us and for those we work with. So, if you’re able, please consider donating to us so we can keep investing in the artists and organisations that help make this place what it is. Please also consider donating to our artistic residents and associates to support them through these difficult times.

Full statement here.

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  • Seriously??! It’s in the middle of the wealthiest financial districts in the whole world. Some of those billionaires can dip into their very very deep pockets.

  • I have absolutely no idea how all these cultural institutions will survive this crisis. This is such a total disaster that only consolation that I can find is that unlike world wars at least we are not being bombed.

    • I wonder if all the £££ millions will still be put into the new London concert hall when normality resumes. That money can probably be better spent

      • Yah think? Like, maybe, a review of medical equipment for other issues so that the next time there is any sort of crisis we will not be faced with the sort of lacks that have so dreadfully shown up during this one?

        Or is it likely to be more like the treatment of veterans after their tours end and they have to battle again for every scrap of help? Will the hard-pressed front line workers we are currently so vocal in supporting slip back into their usual overworked, underpaid, under-resourced world after this crisis passes?

        So much is going to have to be rethought once this is over — and over is a long way away. I have a feeling money for new concert halls will be far from the top of the list of priorities.

    • When there’s a will there’s a way – even when bombing is involved.

      The old National Theatre in Munich, which had seen the premier of Richard Strauss’s Capriccio only a year before, was gutted in an air raid on the night of 3 October 1943. The Prinzregententheater then temporarily housed the Bavarian State Opera from 1944 to 1963, when the present Theatre opened, even though it also suffered damage during the war which was not repaired until 1958.

      If you can, listen to the 1957 live performance of Otto Nicolai’s Die Lustigen Weiber Von Windsor at the Prinzregententheater under Hans Knappertsbusch. It will help you understand how cultural institutions survive.

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