Pianist dedicates his award to synagogue attack victims

The pianist Igor Levit has dedicated his Opus Klassik instrumentalist-of-the-year award on Sunday to victims of the recent attack on a synagogue in Halle.

‘I dedicate my prize to those who have been fighting silently or loudly for years against right-wing extremism, against anti-Semitism, against Islamophobia and against anti-feminism. All of these concepts combine absolute contempt for humanity,’ he said.

 

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  • Gustavo says:

    And the great Wagnertenor Klaus Florian Vogt also went political in his speech.

    He was honoured on behalf for the video production of “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg” from the Bayreuth Festival.

    He said that “Die Meistersinger” had a lot to do with tolerance, exclusion, and reservations about the the unfamiliar, and pledged for tolerance for the new and spoke out against exclusion.

    Heil Stolzing! Heil Beckmesser! Heil Sachs!

    • Eric says:

      Am not sure Meistersinger can bear the weight of this pc spin. As for Vogt, I didn’t know Wagner wrote castrato roles. His voice, if one can call it that, is a good example of how Wagner singing has degenerated and that Bayreuth should award him a prize also says a lot about their standards.

  • His recording of all Beethoven piano-sonatas is sensational

    //basiaconfuoco.com/2019/09/13/igor-levit-neemt-alle-pianosonates-van-beethoven-op-ik-voel-me-niet-als-een-dienaar-maar-ook-niet-als-een-meester-van-wie-dan-ook/

    • Hilary says:

      Furthermore, a pianist who isn’t afraid to stray outside the usual repertoire.

      Earlier this year I heard him play Ronald Stevenson’s DSCH variations at Wigmore Hall. I had mixed feelings about this sprawling piece but was glad he took it on board.

  • Tamino says:

    Agree with his sentiment. Except for the odd ‘anti-feminism’ bit.
    What is anti-feminism anyway?
    He means misogynism?

  • Many thanks to Mr. Levit. He is a professor at the Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien Hannover. His comment is a hopeful sign that Germany’s classical music world moving away from the older mindset of people like Siegfried Mauser.

    Another positive sign is that since the attack in Halle, every synagogue in Germany has had a 24/7 guard by the German police. I see them even at the new synagogue in the little town of Rottweil near where I live. Day in and day out there are two policemen doing nothing but watching the synagogue.

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