Met tenor ‘attacked stranger on subway’

Met tenor ‘attacked stranger on subway’

main

norman lebrecht

August 01, 2019

The New York tenor John Easterlin has been chrged with third-degree assault, following an incident on the subway station at Broadway and West 50th. Easterlin, who has sung comprimario roles at the Met since 2004, is alleged to have approached a woman of 35 and punched her in the ribs.

Neither side has commented.

Easterlin, 57, has also sung at Covent Garden, Vienna, Madrid and the Bolshoi.

 

 

 

Comments

  • Allen says:

    These alleged incidents and accusations should really not be published, especially regarding incidents such as this one. I myself experienced something similar from a crazy old lady in New York in January. It was during the hard freeze where temperatures were around -20 (!) and as I was boarding a city bus, the lady in front of me got paranoid about me being so close to her as I was boarding. She pushed me off the bus, and then told the bus driver that I had assaulted her. The bus driver was obliged to call the police, and I am lucky that this got dismissed and that I didn’t end up with the story here in SlippeDisc!

    • Brian says:

      Slipped Disc is summarizing a NY Post article whose reporting is based on a police report. If you look at the original article, the reporter reached out to both sides for comment and got no response (as indicated above). The reporter did his diligence by asking the tenor for comment. I don’t see any problems with the way this is presented.

  • Cantantelirico says:

    Those comprimario tenors are very high strung. Well at least they still have Matthew Polenzani.

    • Sarah says:

      highly strung …

      • Editor says:

        In a forum where 1) English is not the first language for many commenters and 2) there is not an easy way to edit comments once they are submitted, correction by other commenters of typos or minor grammatical errors is really not necessary and just comes across as pedantic. You’re not adding anything meaningful to the conversation. I am a writer and editor — that’s how I make my living — and really, the little errors are OK. In fact, I am grateful for a diverse community and if everyone’s English is not perfect, it’s OK.

        In fact, if you really want to nit-pick, the phrase should be hyphenated as “highly-strung.” Those who correct grammar should be sure to be … correct. πŸ™‚

        • Just saying says:

          …except that, unless there is a likelihood of ambiguity or misreading, adverb-plus-adjective/participle compounds with an adverb ending in -ly are not hyphenated (reasonably small, fully occupied, highly strung). πŸ™‚

          • Pianofortissimo says:

            Ambiguous missreadings can be very interesting (cf. Freud).

          • Bruce says:

            Without a hyphen, the “highly” in “highly strung” sounds/looks like it means “very” (as in “highly doubtful”). Just sayin (no g).

            For what it’s worth (not much), I learned the expression as “high-strung,” kind of like “tight-assed.” πŸ˜‰

        • Brettermeier says:

          “there is not an easy way to edit comments once they are submitted”

          I love edit-wars!

          (If thumbs-down > 10, please change “love” to “hate”.)

      • *Anonymous-ly says:

        It is correct to say:

        “High-strung” belongs to common class of compound adjectives, often hyphenated, that does not merit this high-handed, high-minded debate with high sounding and high faluting words in a high flown grammatical discussion.

        However, it is *incorrectly to say:

        “*Highly strung” belongs to common class of compound adjectives, often hyphenated, that does not merit this *highly handed, *highly minded debate with *highly sounding and *highly faluting words in a *highly flown grammatical discussion.

    • Beverly Withers says:

      Polenzani isn’t a comprimario but a brilliant leading tenor

  • anonymous says:

    A music critic?

    • Pianofortissimo says:

      Your comment reminds me of Ingmar Bergman (from his notebooks): β€œMy play starts with the actor going down to the salon and strangling a critic and reading from a small black book everything he has written in humiliation. Then he vomits on the public. Then he goes out and shoots a bullet in his head.”

  • Ken says:

    Oh, for Chrissakes. It’s only hyphenated if preceding the noun, not in the predicate. To be technical. And correct.

  • casual observer says:

    As an alleged incident, where “neither side has commented”, I’m not sure how this has managed to make it past the editor? Is this really the standard of journalism on here? It is careers and reputations you are playing with here. ‘Slipped Disc’, – the shoddy tabloid of classical music journalism…

  • Enquiring Mind says:

    Maybe he only “pushed” her in the ribs; it was rush hour.

  • Brian says:

    Slipped Disc is merely summarizing a NY Post article whose reporting is based on a police report. If you look at the original article, the reporter reached out to both sides for comment and got no response (as indicated above). The reporter did his diligence by asking the tenor for comment.

  • Robert Groen says:

    The case has so nothing to do with music that I wonder why Norman bothered to put it on SD….oh wait, music isn’t what SD is about, is it? Even if it was, the word ‘alleged’ should have precluded its inclusion here. Anything else of interest going on in the world of music?

  • Vincent Turner says:

    How about posting the update about the charges being dismissed because the woman was lying?

  • Alex says:

    How about updating the story with the facts that the case was thrown out with no charges filed? Unfair to the accused who DID NOT commit a crime.

  • MOST READ TODAY: