Respected composer makes debut at Berlin porn festival

The somewhat notorious Georg Friedrich Haas, a modernist composer who revels in a master-slave relationship, has appeared at PornFilm Festival Berlin with his partner in a voyeuristic movie, The Artist and the Pervert.

In the short clip below there are shots of full nudity and flagellation.

You have been warned.

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    • When I read, ‘The most important living composer’, my thought was, ‘…apart from Krzysztof Penderecki, Arvo Pärt, Sofia Gubaidulina, Philip Glass, John Adams, John Williams…’

        • He’s known for composing film music, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that he’s not one of the most important living composers. In a career spanning over 60 years he’s composed the soundtracks to more than 100 films, of which 51 have been nominated for Oscars (he’s won 5). The scores to films such as Star Wars, E.T., Jurassic Park, and Schindler’s List are genuinely great pieces of music. Itzhak Perlman considers performing on the soundtrack for Schindler’s List to be one of the most important achievements of his career.

          Furthermore, for many people, John Williams is one of their first introductions to classical music, whether because they love a particular soundtrack, or because his music is endlessly popular with school bands, youth orchestras, etc.

          I guess people would look down on John Williams because he’s commercial and popular, but he’s an important composer, and a good one at that. His music isn’t hard like Boulez, Stockhausen, Xenakis, or Birtwistle, but that doesn’t mean that it has no value.

          • Agreed with all of that, with the caveat that there is more between hard-edge oldfashioned avantgarde and popular film music. There are many serious (!) composers who write sophisticated tonal music, which is neither cheap film music kitsch nor inaccessible poseur patterns, but they don’t trumpet their aesthetics on the barricades of the media, but use their trumpets functionally in their scores.

            The famous book by Robert Reilly explores the tip of the iceberg:

            https://www.futuresymphony.org/suprised-by-the-beauty-of-20th-century-music/

          • Borstlap writes: “don’t write… inaccessible poseur [stuff], but they don’t trumpet their aesthetics on the barricades of the media”.

            John…you are too harsh on yourself.

          • I’m FOND of Xenakis, I often play my recording of his Pitho thing down in the cellar here, when everybody is sleeping, wow! you really feel connected with your deepest soul:

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvH2KYYJg-o

            But when I opened my Kraanerg box which I had not played for years, because it’s so long & I often get sleepy, I noticed a quite unpleasant smell coming from the disc, together with something that looked like a little cloud of smoke. Would that be in the score I wonder. I threw it away but for days my hair had a faint Xenakis odor.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnOETgKzOPM

            Sally

  • My PA forbade me to watch the clip, but I only want to say how happy I am for this man to have found his true destiny.

    • Ha, ha….lets see in 50 years. I have seen him live in Austria many years ago! Never got me – his music!
      For me the most important living composer is Morten Lauridsen. He has a tremdous skill to create harmonies which go deep into souls. His task is not finish yet, symphony and more might come.

        • What do you mean with religious? He does write about eternal topics. He does put poetry into music as well, the poems put into music are utterly perfect and inspiring . We as humans should turn to these aspects of life more often. I was at a concert with him lately, mostly young people, they soaked in his harmonies and some did sit with open mouth in tears, never had they heard such healing music. As I told, a symphony or an opera would not suprise me, he is not at the end with his mastership yet.

          • Maybe those young listeners were not familiar with the religious music by Palestrina or Monteverdi and Bach, or the Mozart masses, or Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis, Brahms’ German Requiem, Wagner’s Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan, Fauré’s Requiem, Stravinsky’s Psalm Symphony, Duruflé’s Requiem, and the many choral/orchestral pieces by Arvo Pärt. Well, it would be a good beginning anyway.

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