Yuja Wang’s dress designer is accused of deception

From CBC Toronto:

A Toronto fashion designer who has dressed international classical music and opera stars owes tens of thousands of dollars to former friends, business partners and employees, a CBC Toronto investigation has found.

Rosemarie Umetsu… and her husband, Wayne, operate a high-end fashion boutique and workshop in Toronto’s Yorkville neighbourhood. Off the stage, the Umetsus are socialites known for hosting sophisticated parties where they rub shoulders with Toronto artists and celebrities. The extensive client list of Atelier Rosemarie Umetsu includes Chinese pianist Lang Lang, Canadian soprano Measha Brueggergosman and Toronto Symphony Orchestra music director Peter Oundjian….

More here.

photo: atelierrosemarieumetsu.com

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    • Don’t know why you find this funny. A lot of people are being hurt by this pair of scammers. The courts should get weaving on really making them pay up.

      • I’d have no optimism that this is going to happen any time soon. But at least they need to be exposed for the shysters they are and people can then avoid them. Social media will do what the courts do not. (I’m afraid there are legions of people just like them!)

  • Well, if the dresses Yuja wears are anything to go buy, she can’t be accused of covering much up….lol
    I suppose one could say that there’s fairly thin line of distinction between a cover up and deception, when all is said and done.

  • From the article: “We’re sorry,” Wayne Umetsu said in an interview.

    Glad we cleared that up.

  • This is hardly news. the Umetsu’s were well known to the arts cognoscenti in Toronto for being charming and fun in social circles who funded their seemingly glamorous lifestyle off the backs of former employees and friends.

    • It’s appalling, if true. I do know one such person in the wine business; never pays his bills and is lionized by the kinds of people who love to gush over successful people. Avoid.

  • “A Toronto fashion designer who has dressed international classical music and opera stars owes tens of thousands of dollars to former friends, business partners and employees,”

    Who cares, except for those involved? Why even post this? A dress designer defrauding some friends and associates isn’t actually anything to do with Wang herself, or classical music or musicians in general. Unless Wang herself is accused of wrongdoing, this is a pointless post.

    • At this stage of Norman’s “career”, people like Wang are his literal lifeblood. Of course he is going to post this to generate clicks and take in that sweet, sweet advertising money. How else is he going to pay the bills?

      We as guests on his blog should be more understanding of the selection of his contents.

    • Yes, but money from ads is money from ads, or wherever else it comes from. Remember Dietmar Machold, the violin dealer – another fraud of a man. …stole millions. Lived like a Prince. I think he just got out of jail.

  • It’s good for public to know about scammers. Can happen to anyone who crosses their path. Happened to me over a decade ago. I didn’t know it was pervasive, nor did I have any media backup. She was not friend nor family. We had a business contract she did not pay up. At least it was not longterm for me. If it is out in the open…less victims. It is a public service to reveal serial scammers.

    “Who cares, except for those involved?” What is that logic? Sure, apathy can be applied to all sorts of news. Like if there was a rapist or if there was a killer. Hopefully less people will be involved with them. If this was in the news before she showed up as a “customer” years ago, then I would not have done work for her nor “sold” her fabric.

    • Well said. I have heard of this designer before but now that I have read this I will never buy from her. It’s important that news like this spread through the industry and this blog is helping do just that.

  • . . . not to mention that they’re saving on the amount of material one normally has to use.

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