Just in: German concert is cancelled due to wartime bomb

Tonight’s concert in Braunschweig by the Orchestre de Chambre de Paris has been called off following the discovery of a 250-kg Second World War bomb not far from the hall.

The disappointed soloist is cellist Gautier Capucon.

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  • “Just in”

    That was yesterday. I had tickets and heard about the cancellation from the parking attendant there. Pretty short notice. Alas, better safe than sorry.

  • The bomb was there for over 70 years and it didn’t go off. It really makes sense to cancel the concert! Quantum physics at its best (Schrödinger’s cat paradox)!

    • It would surely explode now that people know where it is.

      Murphy’s law: “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong”.

      • It’s Friday so I may be wrong about the cat. I am sure it’s still quantum physics, though. I recall reading about the discussion between Einstein and Bohr as to whether the moon really existed if nobody were looking at it.

        As a paraphrase, we can ask if nobody knew about the bomb near the theater, was it really there? And has it become dangerous only now that it has been discovered? My brain is fried and I do not have a PhD in Physics, so please feel free to help!

        • Let me see if I can understand your hypothesis: The bomb remains both intact and exploding until it is observed and interacted with, in which case it is either intact or exploding. Got it?

          In either case I would not attend the concert.

          • I am no Einstein, but theoretically you would not be in a greater danger than attending a concert there a year ago when nobody knew about the bomb.

          • Dear Been-Here-Before,

            According to Einstein’s critique of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum physics the bomb still did not exist about one year ago. Thus, it was no danger to attend a concert there at that point in time. In other words, unless you are a politician or some kind of ideology-minded activist or a post-serialist composer, you can’t apply things like quantum physics to everyday situations. 🙂

          • If Einstein said so then I give up. Now off to hit my head with a frying pan to check if Newton’s laws still apply to everyday situations! Have a great weekend! 🙂

        • “I am sure it’s still quantum physics”

          Sorry, but no.

          “As a paraphrase, we can ask if nobody knew about the bomb near the theater, was it really there?”

          That’s not paraphrasing but a different scenario.

          “My brain is fried and I do not have a PhD in Physics, so please feel free to help!”

          Easy: Don’t use this analogy and you’ll be fine. 😉 But I meant it when I said “look it up sometime”, because it is an interesting thought experiment (even it does not apply here).

          • Ok, Ok, Mr. Quantum Physicist – just please explain to me how this bomb was more dangerous yesterday than any other day over the last 70 years when it was still there but nobody knew about it. Of course the authorities would cancel the concert, but still…

          • “just please explain to me how this bomb was more dangerous yesterday than any other day over the last 70 years”

            An excavator hit the bomb. Some bombs used acid based fuses to delay the detonation (i.e. they should explode after the bombers were gone). This type of bomb detonated in 2010 in Göttingen while defusing, killing three. They are highly unstable. And even more if an excavator rammed it.

            I’m sorry if I sounded a bit harsh. Have a nice weekend (without bombs spoiling it)!

          • Ok. Thank you! This makes sense. Have a great weekend! Hopefully this will be the last bomb to be found there.

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