These top 20 US orchestras are desperately seeking a chief executive

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  • Seattle is the best option for anyone qualified for the job. Seattle is in the midst of a tech boom, owns it’s own hall, and is in a location to attract talent.

    The other jobs are going to be a headache when the orchestra musicians renegotiate their contracts, esp Philly.

  • I am available, for 1/2 the price. My agenda in no particular order:

    1. Zero community outreach and related shenanigans
    2. Serious quality classical programming only (warhorse alert)
    3. Top notch player recruiting and retention
    4. Recruiting of top notch conductors (the few left)
    5. Recruiting of top notch soloists and instrumentalists
    6. Opera in concert with top notch international vocalists only
    7. Cultivation of orchestra signature sound and style
    8. Jaded art school postmodernists should sulk elsewhere
    9. World-class Lied recital series by bona fide and renowned Lied singers (who would be prevented, by contract, to turn their recitals into cutsey chatty sessions and who would also be prevented, by contract, from crossingover and singing with music score)

    • 10. Zero thematic or conceptual programming (what you see is what you get AKA no need to pile up on extra meaning where there may be none)

    • If only a hall didn’t have to sell out, and you could fund the above with just the audience that was quiet and committed. Some of the best concerts I’ve been to were not sellouts – but they were good honest music-making to a faithful crowd.

      • If by “shenanigans” you mean working with schools and children then you can kiss goodbye to nos. 2 – 10 as you’ll end up with no “top notch” artists to work with and no audiences to buy tickets. So good luck with that.

    • If by “shenanigans” you mean working with schools and children then you can kiss goodbye to nos. 2 – 10 as you’ll end up with no “top notch” artists to work with and no audiences to buy tickets. So good luck with that.

      * Sorry, Jon H. I didn’t mean to reply to your reply on this!

    • So your absurd #1 and #2 will ensure that your audience will shrink to a vanishing point and many foundation, corporate, and government funders (as well as rich individuals under the age of 50) will not be interested, meaning that #3-#7 and #9 will not be possible because these things are only possible if you have tons of money. Do you think that the most successful US orchestras operate this way?

  • The Toronto Symphony Orchestra (yes, I know Toronto is in Canada and not the U.S.) also is hunting for a CEO, as well as a new artistic director

  • Why is it a crisis? There are plenty of good managers out there to fill all those jobs. If I had my pick, I’d take Seattle or Minneapolis. Though Houston would offer interesting challenges post-hurricane.

  • Don’t look now, but you can take Dallas off the list as of this morning. DSO just nabbed Kim Noltemy from her position as Boston Symphony COO.

  • This headline is quite funny. I honestly thought there would be 20 names on this list. Really gives you insight into why editors are necessary.

  • Oh puhleeze. The MINNESOTA Orchestra is the furthest thing from desperate. Kevin Smith has led the orchestra from a few months after the lockout ended and has done amazing things with audiences and outreach. He is resigning effective 8/31/18 – just AFTER an international tour including a rescheduled visit to the London Proms. Osmo Vanska has extended his contract through 2022. This is a plum job for the right person.

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