Sicklist: Met loses Brit conductor

Robin Ticciati sicked out of last night’s Eugene Onegin.

 

He was subbed by staff conductor,  Joel Revzen.

 

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  • When TIcciati cancels it is always excellent news for the public. Judging from my previous experiences he is one of the most overrated conductors today.

    • I worked with Robin Ticciati on several occasions – he is one of the best conductors I ever worked with. There are several overrated young conductors around but Robin definitely does not belong to that group.

      • I am genuinely interested to know what qualities Robin has as a conductor & musician that impress you so. I’ve had conversations with other musicians (chamber orchestra) who are big fans, while others find it very challenging to do there job well when he’s conducting (symphony orchestra) . Apart from a seemingly open, engaging and charming persona-and that is already something- his qualities as a conductor have so far eluded me but I’m interested to learn why he appeals.

    • Yes, that’s a horrid phrase. Bearing in mind the back trouble that put him out of action for a year, you should cut him some slack. Sorry about all the negative comments above. I’ve nothing but praise for everything I’ve seen and heard him do. He is a high thinker, his performances let in air and enlightenment; his Brahms, Beethoven and Mozart with the SCO have been revelatory. Ask the players and they’ll say the same.

      • I specially remember a performance of La Mer with the Concertgebouw. Underpowered, played note by note, it left the impression to me that the orchestra conducted him .

      • David, generally with a chamber orchestra it’s fine, a pleasant demeanour and one that doesn’t get in the way of the ensembles chamber skills suffices, but a symphony orchestra needs a conductor-to paraphrase Neeme Järvi- that produces sound themselves or they are not a professional conductor.

        https://youtu.be/78vZVK4JNlo?t=3m38s

        and Pedro, Brian and myself have obviously all observed that larger ensembles get Robin through a performance rather than how it should be i.e. the other way around.

        This conductor has had many advantages, help and support getting the opportunities he has and is so far yet to prove he is up to them. My personal experience is that he is not necessarily the most deserving -based on talent and technique- of all these opportunities he’s had, so while I’m sorry when anyone is unwell, in this case the fact he cannot work at the moment is no great loss and I would welcome seeing someone else being given his great opportunities. Sorry if my point of view is negative to you, but honestly, the continued support in the press of such levels of talent and ability as though they are are talented conductors worthy of peoples attention, has a far greater negative influence on music than the observations above. What you describe above as

        performances (that) let in air and enlightenment;

        to my mind are performances that ‘happen’ when standing in front of a highly skilled ensemble when you are pleasant and don’t get in the way too much. Naturally such a skilled and talented ensemble as the SCO love this as they feel freer and have more space to contribute their talents to the performance. As to his ‘high thinking’ you may well be correct, I don’t have any evidence of this and especially not from any of the performances I’ve heard.

  • Revzen is just awful, and God knows how he ended up on staff. My sympathies to the orchestra and singers.

    • “Revzen is just awful” … in your opinion, of course!
      if he is SO bad, then how/ why did he get the assistant job in the first place?
      If Mr Robin Ticciati is so bad then – similarly, how did HE get the SCO Music Director job?

      • Will, you have obviously have a lot to learn about how a lot of these things really come to pass, it’s not always good to believe the pr.

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