What you really need (no irony) is a Neil Sedaka concerto

From the Lebrecht Album of the Week on scena.org:

What you really need to start 2016 – what you never imagined you’d ever need – is a piano concerto by Neil Sedaka.

Absolutely no irony here. Anyone who can write a novel or concerto start to finish without falling on his/her plot deserves all the credit going and a fair ride from reviewers. Sedaka, 75, made his name with a stream of teen hits in the late 1950s after attending Saturday classes at Juilliard. He hit the #1 jackpot with Oh, Carol, a tribute to his ex-girlfriend Carole King, and never looked back.

Except, perhaps, for a hankering to do some of the stuff he learned at Juilliard.

Read the full review here.

Neil Sedaka at-Red-Piano

 

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  • Heard it, or perhaps another Sedaka concerto, in Ottawa at National Arts Centre years ago. Derivative, inoffensive — not something I would pay for to play again.

  • Thank you, Norman! Friends–don’t be fooled. This is not what you may have heard before or imagine to be a light pop piece. One thing is for certain, I am extremely careful about the choice of repertoire in concert and more so in recorded legacy. This is the real deal–the Real Neil. With Neil’s permission, I added ‘bells and whistles’ to fill out the piano part, and my arrangement of this is what is featured in this recording with Neil’s approval. It is a deeply personal musical reflection of New York City–past and present–which is apparent from the very opening haunting piano solo. For me, I can imagine the boats coming through the New York harbor in the beginning, bringing people from distant lands–for Neil, this would be his ancestors from Europe. This is a tribute to his musical heritage of all styles. This might be a big surprise for our friends: 1956–Neil Sedaka–http://www.wqxr.org/…

  • Interestingly, in the 1960s Sedaka was supposed to participate in the Tchaikovsky Competition. But once the Russkies got a whiff of his pop music accomplishments, he was immediately disqualified.

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