Tchaikovsky piano winner cancels first date

We hear from Mikkeli, in Finland that Dmitry Masleev cancelled his concert last night. His mother died during the Tchaikovsky Competition and Dmitry is taking time out to mourn with his family.

He was replaced as zero notice by the American prize winner, George Li.

george li1

 

share this

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on google
  • While it was very public knowledge that Mr. Masleev’s mother passed away close to the competition, is it really necessary to keep bringing this up and now announce that he’s mourning with his family? This sort of media attention will suffocate a young artist. Two major changes just occurred in his life. Can we all let him just be with the people he loves and then get back to the music that matters so much to us all?

  • Aside from all the hoopla, the social media, online webcasts, reviewers and results, is the fact that this young man continued to perform during what must have been a heart-wrenching time in his life–the loss of his mother. It is enough to witness this event in one’s life, which renders one helpless, relying on the love and support of those around oneself. I often wonder what happened during the competition when Mr. Masleev learned of his mother’s passing, and how it was felt throughout the competition among his colleagues and the staff. I remember the feeling knowing my father was soon to pass, and although it had happened (in 2013) a week after a long set of performances and one month before another several months of touring, it was a very traumatic experience being with him at the time. How Mr. Masleev went onstage and performed after so much preparation during such an emotional time deserves great respect for forging on. I wish him and his family Godspeed, and hope he made many new friends at the competition who will be colleagues for many years. George will surely play splendidly in Mr. Masleev’s place. Mr. Li is one of our finest young musicians and a very respected young man.

    • Unfortunately D. Masleev mum died before round 2. I listen him in the Great HALL and he couldn’t perform almost during part I round 2. Medici somehow corrected sounds for live steam, but in the hall his performance wasn’t good. Only for Mozart concerto he became better, but not the best. As I know he has some problems with right hand and needs a therapy.
      I have to admit that most russian young pianists are like hothouse boys. And mother is the key figure for them. Example – Denis Matsuev (40) whos mum travelling with him still. Or Lucas Genushas, who’s late grandmother Vera Gornostaeva was the most influental professor for years of the Moscow Conservatory and his mum Ksenia Knorre has the same position too. He doesn’t make a step away without his mum.

  • Nicely put, Mr. Biegel. I share your thoughts. My comment is very much a nit in comparison, but, like many people these days, skimming headlines has become almost a necessity in order to keep up with the barrage of real-time news events. The title of this article, as direct as it is, is almost misleading. My immediate impression was that Mr. Masleev simply blew off his first post-competition performance. For what reason? I don’t know. Maybe he was tired, partied too much, or was already showing signs of being a prima donna. I was well into my 3rd article before doubling back to find out the circumstances behind the cancellation. It seems to me that the story would have been better served if its title mentioned the reason behind the cancellation, i.e. “Death In Family Causes Tchaikovsky Piano Winner to Cancel First Date.” My condolences to Mr. Masleev and his family.

    • Thank you, Jim. I am now somewhat perplexed–his mother passed before the competition or during? Nevertheless, it doesn’t matter. It is a very traumatic thing to live through, and all Mr. Masleev needs at this point in his life is his family support and positive best wishes from his extended online ‘family’. That’s the best we can offer to him at this time.

  • Martin Engstrom, Verbier founder and “tch15” juror, spoke in an interview about this, as reported by a Russian website.

    Here’s Google’s automated translation of the short interview. In fact, he, perhaps protecting his privacy, doesn’t cite the death in the family as a reason (which most people would find important and lead to more understanding of his absence) but expresses more generalized concern for Masleev’s experiencing “much tension” and being able to cope with the pressures that are coming up, as the debut on the “world stage” soon is of course a significant factor in his success after he made “the most incredible impression of this contest.”

    He also says he must add words about George Li.

    Shortcut to Google’s automated and somewhat primitive English translation:
    http://bit.ly/tch15-engstrom-en

    • According to the Google translation, Mr. Martin Engstroem said that George Li ” is a fantastic musician with a unique charisma that causes a range of positive emotions.”

  • Martin Engstrom, Verbier founder and “tch15” juror, spoke in an interview about this, as reported by a Russian website.

    Here’s Google’s automated translation of the short interview. In fact, he, perhaps protecting his privacy, doesn’t cite the death in the family as a reason (which most people would find important and lead to more understanding of his absence) but expresses more generalized concern for Masleev’s experiencing “much tension” and being able to cope with the pressures that are coming up, as the debut on the “world stage” soon is of course a significant factor in his success after he made “the most incredible impression of this contest.”

    He also says he must add words about George Li.

    Shortcut to Google’s automated and somewhat primitive English translation.

  • Martin Engstrom, Verbier founder and “tch15” juror, spoke in an interview about this, as reported by a Russian website.

    Here’s Google’s automated translation of the short interview. In fact, he, perhaps protecting his privacy, doesn’t cite the death in the family as a reason (which most people would find important and lead to more understanding of his absence) but expresses more generalized concern for Masleev’s experiencing “much tension” and being able to cope with the pressures that are coming up, as the debut on the “world stage” soon is of course a significant factor in his success after he made “the most incredible impression of this contest.”

    He also says he must add words about George Li.

    Google’s automated and somewhat primitive English translation:
    translation.

    (Apologies if any repeats, as the site is not accepting a shortcut, as far as I can tell, so I am reposting with the long URL.)

    • The verbiers executives place is NOT in a jury. My goodness, a festival organizer in a jury.
      For the rest the jury was pigeon box, jury members flying in and out with only an old sleepy conservatory prof and some others as core members.
      If this is the famous Tchaikovsky competition. What a circus.

      Not to mention the clown during the intermissions between candidates and a bit more serious lady, with their daily journal.
      Contentswise zero value…

      We in Brussels during the queen Elisabeth competition, as tough or even tougher than the Tchaikovsky have a serious TV panel with professional hosts commenting on the performances and their views on music and competitions, moderated by non-clownesque TV presentators, one also to be heard on the classical radio.

      I mean, for Belgium, compared to Russia… The russians seem to be cultural barbarians when you see them.
      And their end show for the proclamation… just show.
      In Brussels each of the laureates shakes hands with the jury, always complete, and receives their ovations from the crowd.

      And 5 competitions at the same time ??? What is that good for. Brussels alternates each year.
      Medici.tv should come to Brussels, Leeds or Von Cliburn, but of course there is a commercial win win situation between medici, Verbier, and the russian winners.

  • I also agree with Jeffrey Siegel’s eloquent words. Glued to the finals I had no idea Mr Maseev had suffered this tragedy. Continuing with ones life after the death of a parent is difficult enough. To have forged ahead as he did under the enormously challenging circumstances under such scrutiny is laudable and amazing. I am all the more impressed with him. Any competition is gruelling. This one particularly so. Condolences to him. I hope that audiences are informed and respect the fact that he must retreat to well deserved privacy that he needs.

  • Dropping musical preferences aside, I can’t imagine what he must have been going though. May he find some solace and comfort with his friends and family. Losing a parent is painful, almost crippling. Losing one with the stress of this competition must have been unbearable.

  • Poor show.
    As worse as the FIFA.
    Masleev with flowers, how sweet.
    This is a Russian contest, ruled by Blatter Gergiev, who, as director suffers from parkinson, and does nog even direct the Tsjaikovski symphonies by heart. I would not like to play under him, my string bow would get stuck in staccatos.
    And the head of the Verbier festival in a jury. Lol.
    What a commercial joke….
    This is a poor poor contest, not worth the name international.

    Lucas was well aware this is not his musical world.
    Working on his cello sonata now he is the one true musician as the true masters like Liszt.
    The rest. Ok, Prokofjev as always my God.

    Lucas Dubargues hatts off.
    Matsuev, Trifonov,… All sick in the same bed, now joined by a Masleev a guy not knowing how the world functions, seeing his reactions.

    Another bunch of standard repertoire Lions. Boring.
    Thanks Lucas tot your cello sonata, andere other neglected Composers you can ressurect.

    Last time I looked this Poetin directed show.

  • >