‘Naked violinist’ faces long wait in New York

Stefan Arzberger, leader of the Leipzig Quartet who stands accused of attempted murder after an incident in a Manhattan hotel, made another court submission yesterday. Here’s his summary:

stefan arzberger

 

dear friends,

not really good news…

here is a statement by my lawyer Mr. R. Levitt:

Today we were in court to discuss various pre-trial issues.
Because we notified the court that we would likely present expert testimony at trial to establish that I had been involuntarily drugged on March 27, the prosecutor asked permission to have me examined by its own psychiatrist, and we said we would voluntarily do so. The court adjourned the proceedings for two months, until August 20, to give the prosecutor time to select a suitable psychiatrist and to speak with me. On the adjourn date we are hopeful that we will receive a favorable report from the prosecutor’s psychiatrist and that, if necessary a trial date will be set. We have explained to the court that we want to begin trial as soon as possible and we are hopeful that the trial will be scheduled to begin no longer than two months after our August 20 adjourn date.


Richard Levitt & Kaizer, Attorneys at Law

 

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  • Norman, you don’t claim “human rights abuse” here. What’s the difference to the Helga Schmidt case?

    As far as I can see, both are charged with a serious criminal offence in a foreign country, both claim they’re innocenct, and both are not allowed to leave the country as long as the investigations go on. Why do you see “human rights abuse” in Spain, but not in the US?

    • One is facing due process for a reported serious crime. In the other case, no crime has been reported and no evidence has been found to press charges.

  • Please explain to me why anyone should feel an ounce of sympathy for this man–because he is a musician? Please. Every story I’ve read states that Mr. Arzberger assaulted a 64 year-old woman in her hotel room after a drunken night. It was his poor decision to pick up a prostitute, and if he was the victim of a drugging and robbery (which appears to be the case) this does not take away from the fact that it took two hotel employees to pull him off that poor woman– as he was attempting to choke her, I might add. While it might mitigate the charges against him if he can prove his case, he has committed a very serious crime.

    • I wholeheartedly agree with you.
      It’s ridiculous that so many people are ignoring the fact that an elderly woman was assaulted and sympathizing with the plight of the violinist.
      You want to play concerts? You want to keep your violin? Fine, then just try not to hang out with transsexual prostitutes and try not to strangle old ladies whilst unclothed.

    • That’s easy.

      If he was drugged, and if the drugs induced his psychosis, then I feel sympathy for both him and the woman he assaulted, and I hope that the perpetrator of the drugging is caught and prosecuted.

      Also, do recognize that it is entirely possible that there is a chicken and egg issue here — his alleged drunken night and picking up of a prostitute may have followed being drugged, and been induced by the drugging.

      All of this is supposition.

      However, anyone who has been drugged against his will can attest to the plausibility of this narrative.

      Let’s hope that the truth comes out, whatever it may be.

    • The sympathy with him has nothing to do with his profession. If he committed the attack under the influence of a drug that he was involuntarily administrated, he cannot be made legally responsible for it. Having drinks in bars and contracting prostitutes is not a crime, even if one might find it morally condemnable. And still it has to be proven that he voluntarily took her to his room.

      Date-rape drugs disappear from blood in less than 24 hours, which makes it so difficult to demonstrate his case. Of course the women who suffered the attack by him also deserves full sympathy, as in the end both are victims in this case. It’s not one against the other.

  • A bit less of the “elderly.” Most 64-year-olds these days are in pretty good nick. Particularly in the US, although, being a hotel, she could have been of any nationality. I know few women in their sixties who consider themselves to be “old ladies.” Bear in mind, these are boomers — and they apparently determined long ago that old was not an option.

      • My point is in my first sentence. It is only an element of the previous post, but it is the one I addressed, I thought quit clearly. It is in no way a commentary on the alleged crime or the victim of it — neither the age or appearance of the woman is relevant to that. But the assumption that a woman of 64 is “elderly” is a bit out of date.

  • OK, I am going to play on this one: say whatever you will about US laws, the NYC attorney general does not charge that easily for attempted murder. It means that this woman saw her death happen during this incident. Luckily she survived, I hope she recovers and will be able to live a half decent life…this is not even certain.
    So to compare attempted murder (documented) with possible fraud (undocumented) is like comparing the flu with cancer! You guys are simply f&$@ing idiots!
    Second, when one is drugged against their will (ask ANY women that has been drugged) it is to subdue them and NOT to send you in a high that will make you take your clothes off, run down you hotel hallway, knock on a stranger’s door and proceed to choke them. This is a party gone horribly wrong…I am sorry for his man, he messed up really bad and now he and his loved one will suffer a great deal…but so is the victim here.
    So, to compare this to possible fraud is simply idiotic!

  • The sympathy with him has nothing to do with his profession. If he committed the attack under the influence of a drug that he was involuntarily administrated, he cannot be made legally responsible for it. Having drinks in bars and contracting prostitutes is not a crime, even if one might find it morally condemnable. And still it has to be proven that he voluntarily took her to his room.

    Date-rape drugs disappear from blood in less than 24 hours, which makes it so difficult to demonstrate his case. Of course the women who suffered the attack by him also deserves full sympathy, as in the end both are victims in this case. It’s not one against the other.

    • According to news reports, he was tested well within 24 hours, with no traces of “date rape drugs.”

      • A highly respected classical musician, married, no prior misdemeanors known, runs amok at 6 in the morning, stark naked, in a NY hotel, knocks on stranger’s doors and chokes them.

        Common sense implies that drugs are most likely involved.

        The trial will be around the question, if he administered the drugs voluntarily or if he was drugged involuntarily. It seems hard to prove either way, unless we get a confession from the transsexual robber.

        There was a robbery, that’s fact. So drugging the victim seems not unlikely.

        The legal question is, who has the burden of proof. Unfortunately for Arzberger since the choking victim sued, he has it, at least as far as (financial) compensation to the victim is concerned.

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