100 concerts to commemorate centenary of Turkish massacre

An orchestra of Armenian musicians has planned a calendar of 100 events to mark the genocide of their people by the Turkish state in 1915, an event that remains officially unacknowledged by most of the world.

Click here for schedule.

They have also recorded a CD.

Let us never forget.

Armenian_web

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  • That is great! I have heard already about the cycle “100 Concerts”, I know that many Armenian and non Armenian musicians performed already for this cycle. Some great names as the pianist E. Kissin were among them. Good luck for future concerts! Artists can do a lot!

  • How wonderful. I was in Yerevan in May and they were already getting ready for the commemorations. President Hollande laid a beautiful wreath at the site above the city chosen for the memorial.

  • That is great! I have heard already about the cycle “100 Concerts”, I know that many Armenian and non Armenian musicians performed already for this cycle. Some great names as the famous pianist E. Kissin were among them. Good luck for future concerts! Artists could do a lot!

  • Even on this Blog nobody seems to care. May be our times are too bad to remember a genocide 100 years ago. May also be today still nobody is interested in the fate of Armenians. In any case it is a shame.

    • I’m not so sure that people don’t care, I think it’s more what you mention immediately afterwards about the current world situation.

  • This is like the Belgian massacre in the Congo: one of those which gets conveniently overlooked. In this case, of course, it is because the aggressive and sometimes rather repressive Turkish government is vigorous in its denial that the deaths can be called genocide. And yet, it was the deliberate, casual deaths of millions of Armenians by the forerunners of the Turkish rulers which led to the creation of the term and concept of ‘genocide’.

    It’s absurd, of course, because there is little doubt that millions of Armenians died during that people’s forced removal from Turkish lands, so the issue of whether the deaths were deliberate or accidental is irrelevant and rather offensive. The deaths were still the responsibility of the Ottomans/Turks (and of course they were deliberate).

    It is time the international community put pressure on Turkey to acknowledge its past (although the UK is hardly the one to do so, given our refusal to acknowledge the deaths caused by our colonial history). At the very least, it should be a condition of Turkey’s entrance into the EU, though that proposal has been rejected.

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