My Turn at the Screw

I’m heading to Glyndebourne this afternoon with a daughter to see Britten’s version of the Henry James story. The conductor is Jakub Hr?ša, the director Jonathan Kent.

The same performance will be beamed live on the internet to anyone who cares to click on the Guardian website.

So why shlepp all the way down to Sussex to see something I could enjoy in the comfort of my home? Simple.

Opera, like sex, is not something you can properly do alone. You need the sense of sharing it with others, even the comfort of strangers.

I’m also intrigued to see whether the live relay affects, in any way, the perception of the audience and performers.

If it does, I’ll report back.

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    • Why not ?

      “Join us on Sunday 21 August to watch The Turn of the Screw streamed live from Glyndebourne. Bookmark this page and return on Sunday to watch Jonathan Kent’s masterly production of Benjamin’s Britten’s chilling opera, and join our critics to discuss the performance online”

      From Guardian web site.

      • And, as it turns out, it is in video form! I saw some of it myself, although I had to do something else and could not stay with it. The video streaming and audio worked very well for me in the USA.

  • saw this production when it visited L.A. , i would take exception with ‘masterly’ but will wait to read your impressions…

  • The trend to convert opera to an electronic music experience, as is the case in these types of events, really shows how far we’ve come from tradition. Despite all the crowing about electronic music as opposed to classical music, society today has settled for the ease, security, and comfort of electrical social networking over the vibrancy of live interaction. There is room for both, of course, but I wonder if eventually we’ll just give up on the unique experience of being human.

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