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Rattle to lead East London academy

September 13, 2018 by norman lebrecht

14 comments.


At a press conference today, Sir Simon Rattle launched an LSO East London Academy to help young musicians from the more deprived half of the metropolis.

Opening at LSO St Luke’s in April 2019, the Acacemy will include coaching, mentoring and masterclasses with LSO players and will be free to all participants.

 


Comments (14)

  1. Furzwängler says:

    Good for Sir Simon ! Excellent news.

    1. Allen says:

      The LSO has been working with kids for years at LSO St Lukes. This is just a logical progression.

  2. Una says:

    I was born and raised in Bow (Tower Hamlets) from a very poor background but rich in other ways which gave me a love of the Jewish faith in the East End, and went to school in Hackney where Diane abbot lives bit woukdnt send her kids tomschool, and I just managed an uphill struggle to succeed in the music profession. I’d have loved to have had this opportunity.

  3. anon says:

    I’ll believe it when I see the black Daniel Harding under Sir Simon’s wings.

    1. Ellingtonia says:

      Oh please, stop your posturing and virtue signalling. I suppose you will be arguing next for black rappers to be taking disadvantaged white boys under their wing………..give me a break!! Rattle did a tremendous amount of work of taking classical music into the community whilst with the Berlin Phil, so tell us just what contribution you have made. Or are you, as well all suspect, nothing but a sniping little whinger!

      1. anon says:

        You are a very ugly person, and having met you, I don’t just mean the inside.

        “….into the community whilst with the Berlin Phil”: Didn’t realize there was a huge black population in Berlin, my bad.

        I tutored someone by the name of Gustavo Dudamel. You?

      2. anon says:

        “black rappers to be taking disadvantaged white boys under their wing”

        Eminem comes to mind.

        You tried to be ironic, but you revealed your racist blind spot, the history of white musicians making it on the backs of black musicians is the very history of jazz, rock, r&b…

        1. Ellingtonia says:

          So you may recall Bonnie Rail commenting that “it took the British bands of the 1960s to introduce us Americans to our own folk music i.e. blues and R&B” and I do believe it was the Stones who insisted that Howling Wolf open for them on their first American TV show. Wasnt it Benny Goodman who refused to tour in the southern states because hoteliers would not allow in black members of his band. Stop playing the racist “victim card”, in my country black musicians have always been welcomed with open arms, even when rejected in their own country and I am thinking Paul Robeson. I saw Basie, MJQ, Dizzy, James Moody, Sam Rivers, Ornette Coleman, Abdullah Ibrahim play to packed out concerts here in the UK. By the way was it “basic English” you tutored Dudamel? Finally, are you suggesting Rattle excluded blacks form the work he did with community groups, if so you are a disgrace.

          1. anon says:

            Unlike you, Ellingtonia, I am not a Windrush Brit. I am the genuine article.

    2. Saxon Broken says:

      Huh? Black people are only 3 percent of the UK population, and are an even smaller part of the EU population. Given how few major conductors from the UK there are, why would you insist that he choices someone who is “black”? Why would it matter, as long as everyone, no matter their background, was given a fair chance?

  4. Ellingtonia says:

    Anon, you seem to think I am a “Windrush Brit” when in fact I am a white male Brit nearing 70 years of age. However, I am sure the members of the windrush generation will be intrigued to know that they are not genuine (unlike you)………. but genuine what?
    As regards music, your knowledge is infantile and extremely limited, come back when you have opened you mind to everyone from Abba to Frank Zappa, Abida Parveen to Tom Waits, Duke Ellington to Richard Thompson, Pavarotti to Jessie Norman, and just for good measure try a bit of Sleepy John Estes and Chester Burnett. There is a whole world of music out there for you to embrace with open arms………..but only when you have finished your tutorials!

    1. anon says:

      Congratulations, you’ve mastered the art of googling and copying and pasting from the internet, I think you might’ve actually impressed your roommate in your nursing home.

      1. Ellingtonia says:

        Nothing copied and pasted, all stuff from my own CD collection, much of which was originally on vynil, but one has to move with the times. All of my knowledge comes from years of reading the now defunct Melody Maker, NME, Jazz Journal, Coda, Gramophone and many other magazines I used to subscribe to. It is obvious that you are oblivious to most of the names I have quoted and inhabit a cocoon world of music constrained by your own limited outlook and personal prejudices. And by the way the inmates of the nursing home loved the Bruce Springsteen live performance of “you never can tell”………..get with it Mr genuine article. And I am still waiting to hear what the “genuine article” is, but you seem unwilling to explain your comment!


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