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Just in: Amsterdam Concertgebouw is evacuated as ceiling crumbles

May 26, 2017 by norman lebrecht

14 comments.


The historic building was evacuated and a late-night techno event abandoned after parts of the ceiling crumbled onto dancers. A performance by Dixon and Job Jobse was cut short by two hours.

The hall management has posted this account:

Last night during a dance event in the Concertgebouw we found that grit had come loose from a plaster moulding above the stage in the Great Hall. We decided to end the event prematurely due to the safety of the visitors. The house is now clear. An inspection found that a small part of the stucco is damaged; this section has now been removed. No one is in danger.

‘It is being examined whether the damage is related to the event. The Concertgebouw hosts dance events a couple of times a year because we wish it to be accessible to as many people as possible. All upcoming concerts and rehearsals will continue.’

It is not clear whether the concert stage or auditorium has been affected.


Comments (14)

  1. Greg says:

    The Concertgebouw? Sigh. If only such decrepitude were to close down certain concert venues here in America (and I’m looking at you ________________ * ).

    * insert name of your least favorite local concert hall (and I have one in mind that could, um, toddle down any ol’ time)

    1. Rgiarola says:

      Name starts with “C”? NY? I think it was an excuse to stop a terrible music. Dutch smart guys

      1. Jon H says:

        Carnegie? At least in Carnegie you can hear across the stage. And if the Berliners like it, it’s probably good enough (for all the rest of the acts they put on).

      2. Sue says:

        Couldn’t agree more; the gods have spoken!!!!!

  2. Peter says:

    Surely due to the excessive bass sound levels that are typical for that kind of modulated noise, aka ‘techno music’?
    Those air pressure sledgehammer attacks can easily crumble stucco.

    1. John Borstlap says:

      A sensitive concert hall can also react to faulty modulations, as happened in 1928 in the Leipzig Gewandhaus when a Bruckner symphony went from B flat minor straight to E major without intermediate keys and a chandelier fell on the Freiherr von Hinterhohenstaufen family.

      1. Rgiarola says:

        If it was in 1938, what family would get the chandelier of Leipzig Gewandhaus? 😉

        1. Peter says:

          And you think that was funny?

  3. David Boxwell says:

    Late. Night. Techo. In the Concertgebouw.

    Willem Mengelberg just rolled over a few times in his unquiet grave.

    1. Sue says:

      Not to mention Carlos Kleiber!!!!

  4. Ungeheuer says:

    Mengelberg is surely spinning 7 feet under

    1. Peter says:

      somebody is always spinning.

  5. JubJub says:

    Does anyone else remember Golders Green Hippodrome ceiling fell down? Fortunately when the BBC Concert Orchestra was taking a break. All repaired according to English Heritage rules (or something) at a cost of £x-million. Then it all fell down again because the plaster could not withstand the decibels, and the BBC moved the CO to Watford. This is all uncorroborated stuff, but others will know the detail. Lot’s of money spent. When will we learn?

  6. Geezer Butler says:

    Must be full of Asbestos like Berlin Staatsoper! They could use a bouncy castle or a prefab.


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