Back

In Russia, they (don’t) discourage women concertmasters

April 30, 2015 by norman lebrecht

4 comments.


Our man in Moscow says there are plenty of chamber orchs that are led by women, but the main symphony orchestras maintain a male closed shop.

Anyone know of exceptions?

Soccer Euro 2012 Poland Russia

UPDATE: Our man in Moscow is wrong. Here’s a list of woman concertmasters from reader Max Grimm:

Lyudmila Tchaikovskaya, Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra
Tatiana Porshneva, Russian National Orchestra
Alexandra Zhavoronkova, Moscow State Symphony Orchestra
Elena Reznichenko, National Philharmonic Orchestra of Russia
Olga Dzerzhinskaya, New Russia State Symphony Orchestra

UPDATE 2: Our man in Moscow says these are all second (or deputy) concertmasters, who don’t qualify as occupants of the first seat.


Comments (4)

  1. sandy says:

    Antonina Kazarina had been leading the Mariinsky orchestra for many years

  2. Max Grimm says:

    Lyudmila Tchaikovskaya, Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra
    Tatiana Porshneva, Russian National Orchestra
    Alexandra Zhavoronkova, Moscow State Symphony Orchestra
    Elena Reznichenko, National Philharmonic Orchestra of Russia
    Olga Dzerzhinskaya, New Russia State Symphony Orchestra

  3. William Lacey says:

    This is not entirely true (like many things one hears about Russia currently). The excellent orchestra of the Stanislavsky – Moscow’s equivalent to ENO – has two female concertmasters. And in fact at a recent performance I conducted there, ALL FIVE string principals were superb female musicians. Moscow’s largest orchestra – the Bolshoi – has just appointed a young woman as principal second. I know, because she played in a performance I conducted there last night! The wonderful Russian National Orchestra has one senior concertmaster – Alexei Bruni – and one assistant concertmaster – Tatiana Porshneva. I could continue, but I think the point is made . . . .

  4. Branimir says:

    “Our man in Moscow says these are all second (or deputy) concertmasters, who don’t qualify as occupants of the first seat.”
    What does it mean? As we know orchestras usually, or always, have more than one concertmaster, what ever be the hierarchy among them. And they are always rotating on the first seat. Norman, get another man in Moscow.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *